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Solomon Kane's Attire/"Costume" (Hat, Clothes, Boots)?


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#101 Guest_TheMIrrorThief_*

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 03:08 PM

I really enjoy this thread, that hat with the big buckle could be used to beat the hell out of somebody
The pic of the pistol is awesome but I have a reference book that says miquelets were around as early as 1550,
don't know how accurate that is though. As for the sash, wasn't Solomon Kane's (REH version) sash a bright
green?

#102 Landsknecht

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 06:51 PM

I don't have a green sash, the one I have I just threw in the cart because an online store screwed up an order, and I had the money already paid. It's boring red silk, and I'm looking for one with more of a texture to it.

Yeah, the boots are workable, but like you mentioned, good ones (and affordable) are tough to find. I've seen literally every style and price in my search, but it seems nigh-impossible to find black bucket-cuff boots that look like they are actually old.

Cloaks, I'm looking into a wool one, and to be screen-accurate, It'd need to have a collar, but no hood, and a leather belt-style clasp. Also, the one I have is about knee-length, rather than floor-length, so I want one that's longer.

As for my pistols, I'm obviously not bringing a real flintlock into a convention hall, that just seems like a bad idea. All mine are much later, around Civil War era and a little before, probably all American-made, so not decorated and fancy, and quite heavy most.

This is pretty much the costume I'm putting together, with some tweaks for cost. I realize it's a bit different than most book and comic depictions, and not period-exact, but it's a fair enough reference to keep me on track.


Some firelock merchants like http://www.loyalista.../mainpage.html# will sell guns without the touch hole drilled which makes them pretty much impossible to fire. You might be able to find some of those old plastic pistol models on Ebay or http://www.sears.com...5_SPM173705147P

Your red sash represents the norm for officers from the 17th-19th century. I suspect that REH was making a point with the bright green sash but never got around to publishing the story(?) Many of the real red silk officers sashes were quite expensive and elaborate. They were strong woven silk that could be used as a hammock or stretcher. Useless trivia for the day.

I work hard to keep my boots looking new and shiny. Just take a short hike through tall wet grass for starters. A little horseback riding, spelunking, and fencing should give them the right worn look.

I have never dealt with these folks but take a look at their wool cloaks: http://www.knownworl...m/clothing.html

TheMirrorThief - I have not seen a definite origin for miquelets cited like for flintlocks but 1550 doesn't sound overly early. Most European ones that I have seen were dated to about 1580 and they were popular in the middle east through the 19th century. I picked up a "fake" miquelet lock ages ago but have never used it. It is a little large, made about 100 years ago, and is "fake" because the main spring is internal but it copies the distinct miquelet square lines. These folks sometimes have them in stock too: http://therifleshoppe.com/
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#103 Askren

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 09:34 AM

Good info. I'll keep my eye out for a green one, but like I said, I want it to have some texture to it rather than flat silk, so it'll really depend what I find.

My troubles right now are specifically with the suede shirt. Not much luck finding one remotely close enough to merit ordering so I can slice it up and lace it back together.

After that, the chest-harness thing, since the one I bought is cheap and ugly.

Oh, and just because you asked: 2 of my 3 blades for the costume. Hand made, wood. They also look to be quite the finishing touch once I can get my hands on them and weather them up properly.

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#104 Kahn

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 05:57 PM

I've been to two conventions dressed as Solomon Kane now. Only a few people actually recognised me straight off. I've been mistaken from Bruce Wayne to Oliver Cromwell, but obviously the most common guess I get is Hugh Jackman's Van Helsing.
I went for the more classic Kane with a rapier/ main gauche combo and two flintlock pistols. A long coat rather than cloak and I do have a bright green sash which was just some fabric bought from ebay doubled over and sewn into place.
If I can remember which photo-sharing site I opened an account with (years ago) I'll post a pic sometime.

I'm working on a juju staff atm too. I sculpted a reasonable facsimile of Bast's head and just need a good staff shaft for it.

Edited by Kahn, 08 October 2011 - 11:44 AM.


#105 deuce

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 11:59 AM

I've been to two conventions dressed as Solomon Kane now. Only a few people actually recognised me straight off. I've been mistaken from Bruce Wayne to Oliver Cromwell, but obviously the most common guess I get is Hugh Jackman's Van Helsing.
I went for the more classic Kane with a rapier/ main gauche combo and two flintlock pistols. A long coat rather than cloak and I do have a bright green sash which was just some fabric bought from ebay doubled over and sewn into place.
If I can remember which photo-sharing site I opened an account with (years ago) I'll post a pic sometime.

I'm working on a juju staff atm too. I sculpted a reasonable facsimile of Bast's head and just need a good staff shaft for it.


Cool on you, Kahn. B) However, SK doesn't seem to have been much of a main gauche dude. Stick as close as you can to REH's descriptions. Lord knows others have strayed FAR from that Puritan's progress. ;)

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#106 Kahn

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Posted 24 November 2011 - 02:06 PM

Well a main gauche is basically a companion dagger to a rapier. I know some of them look a bit unusual with sail guards and extended trident style quillons etc, but the prop I have is based on a Gustav style dagger and quite similar to the one Askren posted a picture of.

The rapier was modeled on the Pappenheimer sword, which is probably a little later than SK's time, but had the right sort of design with a long double edged blade for cut as well as thrust.

#107 Fierro

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 04:26 PM

9781848547568.jpgA little SK influence perhaps?



#108 deuce

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 09:36 AM

As far as I am concerned, I don't see problems with any period representation of SK. Plans for my new SK-costume are just in their very first days - as my SK-page is.
But when I have a look at pics of puritans I don't see any problems why SK should look different (okay, he's wearing all black, but that's no problem) => http://www.hyborianworld.com/kane/

 

Let us know when you get your website up and rolling, Andrarir!


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#109 Dantai

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 09:27 PM

Solomon Kane is consistently described in Howard's work as wearing a "slouch hat", but in illustrations he is just as consistently shown wearing a capotain. There are two possibilities here:

  1. Howard didn't know what a slouch hat was, and thought it looked like a capotain does.
  2. Artists are getting it wrong.

Of course, the second possibility is the most likely, but the image of Solomon Kane is traditional puritan garb is so ingrained that I still find myself doubting. But Howard was a southerner on the dying frontier; if anyone knew about hats, surely he did.

 

The slouch hat which Howard depicts is, I imagine, the kind we commonly associate with the musketeers, rather than the US/Australian variant. The "slouch" in slouch hat simply refers to the far that one side of the brim "slouches" while the other is pinned. They were less common in the 16th century but very popular in the 17th. The capotain, too, only became popular around the 1690s, so both are of the right period.

 

And don't get me started on him never being depicted with the Spanish rapier Howard consistently describes him as weilding (though Howard calls it a "foil"--"Solomon Kane's Homecoming" identifies it as a "Spanish sword").


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#110 Landsknecht

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 06:31 PM

Despite REH's genius he was not overly educated, did not have access to modern research, and terms sometimes had different meanings nearly a century ago. 

 

He probably saw illustrations like this and did his best to describe the features in a sellable way.

 

Musketeer.jpg

 

"Foil" is another term that has changed over the centuries.  Shakespeare implies that a military rapier with a clip-on metal button for practice was a foil.  He might have just needed the sound of the word foil. 

 

REH also talks about flintlocks but modern gun snobs will insist that the first true flintlock was given to the king of France in 1615.  Of course these historians argue that a 1560 miquelet was not a flintlock, even though it works exactly the same, because its mainspring was on the outside.  Of course these revisionist had not been born when REH was writing stories that will be read hundreds of times more than their books. 

 

A Spanish rapier was a very distinct weapon from the late 1500s through the early 1800s so REH probably meant: 

 

d5268171l.jpg

 

The cup hilt does have a certain resemblance to a foil guard. 

 

It would be nice to actually have a sketch done by REH showing just what he meant.  As a history buff I have my own mental picture of Solomon Kane that I am happy with but it is probably different than other folk's. 


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#111 deuce

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 07:38 PM

Despite REH's genius he was not overly educated, did not have access to modern research, and terms sometimes had different meanings nearly a century ago. 
 
He probably saw illustrations like this and did his best to describe the features in a sellable way.
 
Musketeer.jpg



That's the way I see it as well, Landsknecht. In Swords of the Red Brotherhood, REH seems to make other "fashion" mistakes. He never claimed to be an expert regarding such. In fact, quite the opposite.
 

 

"Foil" is another term that has changed over the centuries.  Shakespeare implies that a military rapier with a clip-on metal button for practice was a foil.  He might have just needed the sound of the word foil. 
 
REH also talks about flintlocks but modern gun snobs will insist that the first true flintlock was given to the king of France in 1615.  Of course these historians argue that a 1560 miquelet was not a flintlock, even though it works exactly the same, because its mainspring was on the outside.  Of course these revisionist had not been born when REH was writing stories that will be read hundreds of times more than their books. 
 
A Spanish rapier was a very distinct weapon from the late 1500s through the early 1800s so REH probably meant: 
 
d5268171l.jpg
 
The cup hilt does have a certain resemblance to a foil guard. 
 
It would be nice to actually have a sketch done by REH showing just what he meant.  As a history buff I have my own mental picture of Solomon Kane that I am happy with but it is probably different than other folk's.


The SK "Firearms" thread is here:  http://www.conan.com...722&hl=firearms

 

...and the SK "Sword" topic is here:  http://www.conan.com...c=6665&hl=sword


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#112 John Maddox Roberts

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 02:00 AM

I'm late to the party here. In the Civil War, the common "Kossuth" hat, seen on innumerable soldiers, especially cavalry, was often referred to as a "slouch" hat. It might have a pinned brim or it might not. Huckleberry Finn refers to his father's shapeless hat as a "slouch."  Howard may have used the term to mean simply a wide-brimmed hat without stiffening in the brim.



#113 deuce

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 10:25 PM

 Huckleberry Finn refers to his father's shapeless hat as a "slouch."  Howard may have used the term to mean simply a wide-brimmed hat without stiffening in the brim.

 

That's exactly how I see it, JMR.


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#114 Waldgeist

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Posted 25 December 2014 - 11:34 PM

Never forget how word and rhythm focused his writing was. Filled to the brim with combinations that just sound awesome and roll of the tongue beautifully. Maybe he sometimes just used a word to describe a thing, because it sounded right in that sentence, even though technically it wasn't exactly the right term for it. Lovecraft did that too all the time. Slouch maybe just sounded better than some fancy, fashion correct term.

 

And when it comes to weapons and their description we know that throughout history people have been mostly calling the "sword of the day" just that: sword. All these fancy terms were coined and defined after Howard had long passed, or weren't as widespread knowledge as they are today. Heck look at 99% of all roleplaying games. These dudes are often highly educated, have access to the digital knowledge of the world and they still call a simple one handed sword 14th century sword like an oakshott XIV a "broad sword" and all the other wrongly assigned terms they throw around confusing the kids :D

 

Cheers,

Waldgeist


Edited by Waldgeist, 15 January 2015 - 09:05 PM.

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