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#1 Mike_The_Barbarian

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 11:35 PM

This thread is intended for every type of book that that does not fit into the Fantasy genre.

Please feel free to recommend any book you wish! :)

All the books will be listed at the top of the thread for people to browse through them easily.

How to recommend a book:

First, you will need to find and book and read it.

Once you have found a book you wish to recommend, post it here.

You should include the title of the book, along with the author. If it is possible, you could also include the publisher, and even the ISBN number to make it easier for others to get their hands on it.

Then have a small review of the book (with no spoilers) to entice any readers, and thoughts you may have along with any reasons you enjoyed it.

If you want to post your own individual thread discussing the book in more detail that would be wonderful (and very much appreciated. This way others can give their thoughts on it, ask any questions they might have, and generally have a more in-depth discussion. You can then put a link in this thread ? at the bottom of your recommendation - for anyone to join in with the discussion.

This thread is for all genres but Fantasy. The Fantasy thread can be found Here. And please only have one post per book. If you wish to discuss it further, please make it a separate thread, because it will make this thread a lot easier to maintain.

Please abide the forum rules.

If you have any ideas for improving this thread, please post them Here or in Crom's Suggestion Box.

And don?t forget; enjoy yourself! :D

Edited by Mike_The_Barbarian, 25 October 2006 - 12:30 AM.

They are the weak and cowardly who, when the enemy is crashing through the front door, will cower in the back room, counting on better men than themselves to make and keep them free.

Obsessed is just a word the lazy use to describe the dedicated!

Pain is weakness leaving the body

#2 Mike_The_Barbarian

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 11:36 PM

The List of books other members have recommended!

Shogun by James Clavell

Tai Pan by James Clavell

King Rat by James Clavell

Ringu by Koji Suzuki

The 47 Ronin by Eiji Yoshikawa

Musashi by Eiji Yoshikawa

Battle Royale by Koushun Takami

Romance Of The Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong

The Count Of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

I Am Legend by Richard Matheson

The Long Walk by Stephen King

The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty

The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury

1984 by George Orwell

The Lonely Winds by B.I.Flight

Age Of The Gunfighter: Men And Weapons Of The Frontier 1840 - 1900 by Joseph G. Rosa

Triggernometry: A Gallery Of Gunfighters : With Technical Notes On Leather Slapping As A Fine Art, Gathered From Many A Loose Holstered Expert Over The Years by Eugene Cunningham

The Wolfen by Whitley Strieber

Celtic Tetralogy by Henry Treece

More Ghosts And Eerie Tales Of Alabama; True Tales Of The Supernatural And The Unexplained by David Middleton Edelen II

Suttree by Cormac McCarthy

Blue Gold by Clive Cussler

Atlantis Found by Clive Cussler

Fire Ice by Clive Cussler

Sandstorm by James Rollins

Dawn of Empire by Sam Barone

Saxon Series by Bernard Cornwell

Babylon 5 Trilogy - Dark Genesis by Gregory Keyes

Slain The Exile by Steven Savile

Frankenstein: The Shadow Of Frankenstein by Stefan Petrucha

The Shooters by Claire Metz

Edited by Mike_The_Barbarian, 12 December 2006 - 01:01 AM.

They are the weak and cowardly who, when the enemy is crashing through the front door, will cower in the back room, counting on better men than themselves to make and keep them free.

Obsessed is just a word the lazy use to describe the dedicated!

Pain is weakness leaving the body

#3 Majere

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 02:08 AM

Hmm... don't know exactly what you're looking for, but here's a list of some books I'd reccommend to anyone interested in reading something other than fantasy/sword-and-sorcery. I've got too many rattling around in my head to name, but I'll throw them out until I get tired of tying. :lol:

SHOGUN by James Clavell
I read this book when I was 16. I remember seeing it on the book shelf of a local retail store. Every time I went, I saw this thick, thousand page book with a sword on it's red and black cover, the inside cover filled with praise for the story and for it's author. I finally picked it up, and the rest, as they say, is history. I finished it in a week, and I can safely say it was the focal point that set me off on my fascination with Japan. The story is so complex, and filled with so many wonderful characters, that I couldn't possibly hope to summarize it here. But I'll try to give you some idea anyway. The Year is 1600. Pilot-Major John Blackthorne and surviving crew members are shipwrecked in Fuedal Japan and taken prisoner. Their ship, weapons, and supplies are confiscated, and the men are imprisoned. What follows is one man's journey through an alien, hostile world filled with civil strife and a people with an unwavering loyalty and sense of honor. A world where Death is a way of life. A world that embraces beauty, tragedy, and sorrow above all. I simply cannot say enough about this book. I reccommend this book to anyone. And if you don't enjoy it, if it's a waste of your time, I will personally paypal you your money back.

TAI PAN by James Clavell
While not as epic or emotional as Shogun, Tai Pan is nevertheless an outstanding novel from an outstanding author. Dirk Straun, founder of The Noble House, lives, loves, and struggles through life in old China, walking the thin line of balance between family loyalty and loyalty to his undying thirst for dominance in trade and life. Highly reccommend this one.

KING RAT by James Clavell
Semi-autobiographical account of Clavell's time spent as a prisoner in Japan's World War II prison camp, Changi. James Clavell nearly died in Changi, Japan's worst and most notorious prison camp at that time. Upon returning home, Clavell spent months on end unemployed. He spent most days just lying on the couch, lost in his own tortured memories. James's wife finally gave him an ultimatum. Get a job and support your family, or get out. Clavell then set out to put down his war-time experiences on paper, which resulted in this, his first novel, King Rat. And it is one of his best. Where most men would have nothing but scorn and bigotry for their captors, Mr. Clavell developed a fascination for, and love of, the far east (Japan and China) that lasted the rest of his life. I'd reccommend this book for anyone new to James Clavell's works. It's the shortest, and one of the most powerful, haunting pieces that he ever did.

RINGU by Koji Suzuki
You know the movies, but this was the book that started it all. A reporter, investigating the sudden, simultaneous deaths of 4 teenagers, stumbles across a cursed videotape that informs the viewer that he will, in 7 days, die, unless he performs the following... and then of course, the rest of the tape has been recorded over. Now Asakawa has 7 days to figure out the charm to the video, and save not only his own life, but the lives of his wife and daughter, who have also unwittingly viewed the video as well. Will Asakawa save his family? At what price? Would you trade the fate of humanity for the life of someone you love? Is any price too high?

THE 47 RONIN by John Allyn
The true life story of 47 Samurai that stunned Japan. What is honor? How far would you go regain it for a fallen friend, even if it meant dishonoring yourself in the process? Excellent, excellent book.

MUSASHI by Eiji Yoshikawa
Another true life story of the greatest swordsman who ever lived.

BATTLE ROYALE by Koushun Takami
The book that inspired the movie. A few years from now, the school system has become corrupt beyond repair. Unemployment is at an all-time high. With no hope for a future, students boycott class regularly. In retaliation, the government enacts the Battle Royale program. Ever year a middle school class is selected to "play a game." Drugged and transported to a small island, the students are forced into a contest with only one rule: Kill your friends. Kill everyone until there is only one of you left. The winner goes home. Explosive collars are placed on their necks. They are shock-proof, water-proof, and will explode when tampered with in anyway. In three days time, the collars will be detonated if there is no winner. Each student is given a bag with food, water, a map, compass, flashlight, and one weapon. You may get lucky. You may not. You may get a knife, an ax, or a gun. Or you may get a pot-lid. How far would you go to survive? Could you kill your best friend? Awesome book, awesome movie, and highly, HIGHLY reccommended.

ROMANCE OF THE THREE KINGDOMS by Luo Guanzhong
In the West, the Bible. In the East, Three Kingdoms. The empire long divided must unite, long united must divide, thus it has ever been. It's the end of the Han Dynasty, and generals have arisen throughout the land to vie for power. In a small town, a poor weaver and sandal maker vows to restore honor to the fallen Han Dynasty. His name is Liu Bei, and together with Guan Yu and Zhang Fei, takes an oath of brotherhood in a peach garden. "We three, though of separate ancestry, join in brotherhood here, combining strength and purpose, to relieve the present crisis. We will perform our duty to the Emperor and protect the common folk of the land. We dare not hope to be together always but hereby vow to die the selfsame day. Let shining heaven above and the fruitful land below bear witness to our resolve. May heaven and man scourge whosoever fails this vow." This is, quite simply, one of the greatest stories ever told. But keep in mind, this is the land of the East, where there are no happy endings.

THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO by Alexandre Dumas
How far will one man go for revenge?

I AM LEGEND by Richard Matheson
Excellent vampire/zombie story with a great twist at the end.

THE LONG WALK by Stephen King
Another game of death involving youth. Only here, students have willingly signed up to play this game. A very simple contest. Walk until you can't walk anymore. The last one left walking wins the game. Only the catch is, when you stop walking, you are shot in the back of the head by the soliders sent to follow behind you. Stephen King, the second most over-rated author in english literature today (#1 being J.K. Rowling) delivers what is, in my opinion, his greatest novel. And he plays it straight. Alot of authors would've had the kids lead some successful rebellion against the system and survive. King does no such thing. There is only one winner here. If indeed, there is any winner at all...

THE EXORCIST by William Peter Blatty
Probably one of the most disturbing books I've ever read. I've never seen the movie, but I read this as a young teenager, and it definitley made me a little uncomfortable. Which is a good thing. Suspensful, spooky, and blasphemous. Highly reccommended, especially now that it is getting close to Halloween!

THE MARTIAN CHRONICLES by Ray Bradbury
Great stuff here. Reminds me of an old saying about the United States. They'll kill your people, they'll blow your stuff up, and then they'll plant a godamn McDonalds right in the middle of the rubble.

1984 by George Orwell
Hauntingly accurate. He got the facts right, but the date wrong. If this book had been named 2004, it would've been right on the money. Big Brother, Goldstein, the war on terror, it's all here ladies and gentleman. War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength.


Well, that's it for now. Hope you guys like the list, and check some of these books out if you haven't read them. If you have, let me know what you think.

Peace everybody,
-M-
"The Perfect Blossom is a rare thing. A man could spend his entire life searching for one, and it would not be a wasted life."

#4 BIFlight

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 05:09 AM

The Lonely Winds by myself, B. I. Flight

I asked if it were all right to suggest my own work, and was told it was ok, so here's my effort whoring myself out. :D

Here's a link to the Amazon.com listing for it, which includes a number of outstanding reviews:
http://www.amazon.co...i...TF8&s=books

If you want a review/opinion closer to home, our own Painbrush has read the book, and might even share his thoughts with you if you ask him very nicely.

EDIT: I forgot to mention: If you're really interested, click the first link in my signature. It will take you to a thread on my forum where you can read a good portion of the book itself for free. Enjoy!

Edited by BIFlight, 25 October 2006 - 05:59 AM.

www.thelonelywinds.com/library.php

#5 vikingwarrior

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 11:43 PM

I have read several of the books that you listed, Shogun and The Long Walk being my favorites.
I too read Shogun for the first time as a teeager and it sparked a lifelong interest in the Japanese culture and history for me as well. The length may be a bit daunting for some, but it is definately worth it.
I am a marginal Stephen King fan. I think he has written quite a few decent books. The Long Walk was written originally under the pseudonym Richard Bachman. All of the books that he wrote as Richard Bachman have a different feel than his other stuff, and they were all written early on in his writing career, in the same time frame as Carrie, Cujo, Salem's Lot and Christine to name a few. (with the exception of The Regulators, which wasnt really any different than the other stuff he was putting out around the same time writting as himself) All of those early novels have a totally different feel than his later stuff. Anyway, the story is very unusual, and it is one of my favorite Stephen King books. Another from the same period that you may like if you liked The Long Walk is The Running Man. Yes, it was adapted into a super stupid Ahhh-nhold flick in the 80's, but really the only similarity is the name. It has that feel of some dark twisted futureistic society that may really be right around the corner.

I will add some short reviews of some of my favorites in a day or two when I have more time.

#6 Majere

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 04:53 AM

I have read several of the books that you listed, Shogun and The Long Walk being my favorites.
I too read Shogun for the first time as a teeager and it sparked a lifelong interest in the Japanese culture and history for me as well. The length may be a bit daunting for some, but it is definately worth it.
I am a marginal Stephen King fan. I think he has written quite a few decent books. The Long Walk was written originally under the pseudonym Richard Bachman. All of the books that he wrote as Richard Bachman have a different feel than his other stuff, and they were all written early on in his writing career, in the same time frame as Carrie, Cujo, Salem's Lot and Christine to name a few. (with the exception of The Regulators, which wasnt really any different than the other stuff he was putting out around the same time writting as himself) All of those early novels have a totally different feel than his later stuff. Anyway, the story is very unusual, and it is one of my favorite Stephen King books. Another from the same period that you may like if you liked The Long Walk is The Running Man. Yes, it was adapted into a super stupid Ahhh-nhold flick in the 80's, but really the only similarity is the name. It has that feel of some dark twisted futureistic society that may really be right around the corner.

I will add some short reviews of some of my favorites in a day or two when I have more time.

If you liked The Long Walk, you should definitley check out Battle Royale. Both the book and the movie. Very good stuff.

Peace,
-M-
"The Perfect Blossom is a rare thing. A man could spend his entire life searching for one, and it would not be a wasted life."

#7 PainBrush

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 10:41 AM

The Lonely Winds by myself, B. I. Flight
=sr_1_3/002-1363362-4091220?ie=UTF8&s=books]http://www.amazon.com/Lonely-Winds-B-I-Fli...TF8&s=books[/url]

If you want a review/opinion closer to home, our own Painbrush has read the book, and might even share his thoughts with you if you ask him very nicely.

- It sucked so bad that ............ just kidding ! I'm as much of a horror-story fan as I am of a Howard fan - B.F.'s book is pretty damn good !! - Vampire killers with attitude problems & personality quirks that make them like people you've known all your lives ( & avoided ).


p.s. - that plain cover left a lot to be desired ( it almost had me worried it was a romance novel or something ) - for your next book - give me a holler & I'll paint something worthy of the content .

Edited by PAINBRUSH, 28 October 2006 - 10:47 AM.

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#8 BIFlight

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 04:23 PM

Consider it done, my friend! Heck, I probably owe you--just saying a few nice words about my work on this forum probably had about fifty people hitting links to learn more about it! :lol:
www.thelonelywinds.com/library.php

#9 Pontifex

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 03:26 PM

Consider it done, my friend! Heck, I probably owe you--just saying a few nice words about my work on this forum probably had about fifty people hitting links to learn more about it! :lol:



I was one of those people. It sounds really interesting :)


I also want to add a recommendation or two.

Age of the Gunfighter: Men and Weapons of the Frontier 1840-1900 by Joseph G. Rosa
"Age of the Gunfighter tells the story of the tempestuous life and times of the notorious gunfighters of the American West. The book provides a vivid account of this violent time, combining contemporary accounts with meticulous historical research and an unjaundiced appraisal of the facts. Telling the story of every major gunfighter, peace officer, and outlaw of the American West, Joseph G. Rosa places them in the context of an unpredictable frontier and the coming of law and order."

That description is from Amazon.com. The book is full of color photos of firearms and other weapons along with some clothing and accessories. There are also several wonderful paintings depicting the west in the book also.


Triggernometry: A Gallery of Gunfighters : With Technical Notes on Leather Slapping As a Fine Art, Gathered from Many a Loose Holstered Expert over the Years by Eugene Cunningham
This is another book with information about several gunmen and gunfighters of the Old West. Many famous, and some not so famous (at least I had never heard of some of them). I'm probably not even half way through the book yet but I am thoroughly enjoying it already. The original version of the book was published in 1934 I believe. The author actually met with several of the people he wrote about or people who lived during the time and may have known them. He also gets both sides of the stories. For example, the O.K. Corral gunfight between the Earps and the McLowerys & Clantons. He gets what happened from the Earp side and the McLowery-Clanton side.
What I really find interesting about this book is that it gets more of a personal approach to the stories of the people instead of a purely informational aspect.

Edited by Pontifex, 30 October 2006 - 03:43 PM.


#10 Guest_fiendlurking_*

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 12:18 AM

Id like to suggest "The Wolfen" by: Whitley Strieber

...quite possibly one of the greatest horror novels ever written...if you've ever seen the movie it definitely does not do it justice...if your even mildly interested in anything involving werewolves its a must read!

#11 deuce

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 07:18 AM

A plausible book that scared the bejeezus outta me in jr. high. The movie did NOT do it justice.

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#12 Mikey_C

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 09:13 PM

Henry Treece's Celtic Tetralogy

I read these years ago and have recently started collecting them. Gritty, bleak and brutal: should go down well with Bran Mak Morn fans. :D
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#13 Freebooter

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Posted 06 November 2006 - 02:59 AM

Hello all,
I have read many great books in my life, too many to list or get into. I would not even know where to begin.
So, and I hope I am breaking no rule here, but at the risk of being vain, I'll tell you, I did publish my first book last year. Since it is not far past Halloween I will mention it. It is called

"MORE GHOSTS AND EERIE TALES OF ALABAMA; True Tales of the Supernatural and the Unexplained!"

By David Middleton Edelen II.

ISBN # is ISBN: 1-4137-4544-X, 134 pages, 5.5 x 8.5.

The publisher is Publish America. It contains 24 TRUE stories of not only ghosts but other strange creatures and beings, some documented by reports to the law, etc., such as Bigfoot, Werewolves, Little People, Witches, Mothmen, etc., which all happened in the Montgomery, Elmore, and Autauga County areas of Alabama. Most people that have read it said they enjoyed it quit a bit.

In case any of y'all are interested, it can be found at the publisher (4 dollars off) at www.publishamerica.com/books/8363 , or ordered from any bookstore, amazon.com, etc..
Take care,
Freebooter
Millbrook, Al.
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I, who was born in a naked land and bred in the open sky.
The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die dogs--I was a man before I was a king!
---From The Road of Kings

#14 mckennal

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Posted 06 November 2006 - 03:29 AM

If there's one book I'm referring to any- and everyone right now, it's Cormac McCarthy's _Suttree_. It's set in my home state and is the most horrifying but humorous yet noble book I think I've ever read.


I could list a slew of others, but I'll keep it at that for now.

Please let me know if you actually pick this up and give it a shot.

(Or if you've read it already.)
"'Cept for being wanted for murder and shootin' up a lot of townsfolks, life was a little boring anyway." - Jonah Hex

#15 Dragon Girl

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 03:33 AM

Has anyone read anything by Clive Cussler? I've read three of his books so far--Blue Gold, Atlantis Found, and Fire Ice, and they're all pretty good. Parts of his books are kind of clich?d, but they're good, fun, James Bond-like adventures with macho heroes, beautiful women, thoroughly evil villains, and some complex and unexpected plot developments. It's always hard for me to put his books down because I can't wait to see what happens next! His heroes work for a group called NUMA, a real-life volunteer maritime agency founded by Cussler. I guess one of his books, "Raise the Titanic," was made into a movie, but was so awful that he has refused to have any more of his books made into movies unless he is given casting and directing rights!

Edited by Dragon Girl, 18 November 2006 - 03:37 AM.

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#16 Kane

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 08:38 PM

Has anyone read anything by Clive Cussler? I've read three of his books so far--Blue Gold, Atlantis Found, and Fire Ice, and they're all pretty good. Parts of his books are kind of clich?d, but they're good, fun, James Bond-like adventures with macho heroes, beautiful women, thoroughly evil villains, and some complex and unexpected plot developments. It's always hard for me to put his books down because I can't wait to see what happens next! His heroes work for a group called NUMA, a real-life volunteer maritime agency founded by Cussler. I guess one of his books, "Raise the Titanic," was made into a movie, but was so awful that he has refused to have any more of his books made into movies unless he is given casting and directing rights!

I've been a big Cussler fan every since I first read "Raise the Titanic" back in '82. If anyone wants a good modern pulp style adventure then you owe it to yourself to read one of his Dirk Pitt novels.

DG, although it leaves out a number of the subplots, the movie Sahara is based on the Cussler novel of the same name. I was surprised at how well the actors were at bringing the characters to the screen. Well worth the time to watch.
Your correct about the film version of RtT. Cussler was so disappointed about the way the movie turned out that he refused to release any rights untill a couple of years ago. That's how the film Sahara was able to get made. although, it seems that Cussler was not happy how that film turned out. He now claims that he will never allow any of his novels to produced for film.

Funny thing, all the Cussler fans that I know thought that Sahara was very good and kept to the sprit of the novel.
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And dead gods I will again defy?"

#17 mckennal

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 12:08 PM

I'd go for a Nelson Demille book before I'd read Cussler. Just my personal preference.
"'Cept for being wanted for murder and shootin' up a lot of townsfolks, life was a little boring anyway." - Jonah Hex

#18 The Lion-Lord

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 08:30 PM


I'd go for a Nelson Demille book before I'd read Cussler. Just my personal preference.


Hi!

I'd like to recommend James Rollins who writes fast-paced action suspense, and uses a lot of scientific speculation in his stories. So, if you like Cussler or Crichton, he's right up there with them!
A good one to start with is Sandstorm (2004). An explosion in the British Museum leads to a search for a lost city in the sands of the Middle East. I felt it was an adventure that Conan would have enjoyed... This book introduces the government team of SIGMA which has appeared in his subsequent books, Map of Bones and Black Order.
Try 'em!

The Lion-Lord

#19 deuce

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 08:47 PM



I'd go for a Nelson Demille book before I'd read Cussler. Just my personal preference.


Hi!

I'd like to recommend James Rollins who writes fast-paced action suspense, and uses a lot of scientific speculation in his stories. So, if you like Cussler or Crichton, he's right up there with them!
A good one to start with is Sandstorm (2004). An explosion in the British Museum leads to a search for a lost city in the sands of the Middle East. I felt it was an adventure that Conan would have enjoyed... This book introduces the government team of SIGMA which has appeared in his subsequent books, Map of Bones and Black Order.
Try 'em!

The Lion-Lord



Hey Lion-Lord! Good to see you back on the forum!

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#20 Almuric

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 06:26 AM

I'm nearly finished reading Sam Barone's Dawn of Empire, set 3200 years ago in Mesopotamia. The village of Orak has been raided by barbarians in the past and is threatened once again. Eskkar, a former barbarian who has settled down in Orak, has a plan to protect the village by constructing a wall around it, but time is short. From this battle will come the beginnings of civilization.

It makes the history feel real, instead of a lecture. People didn't just one day decide to build cities, they were created for reasons and because of the choices of people. Since this all happened in what might be considered the real Hyborian Age, we can only speculate on the specifics. There's lots of action, and a steady building of tension as the wall is built in the shadow of the impending invasion. Eskkar is an interesting protagonist, a barbarian who fights for civilization, in the process becoming a leader and king. The barbarians are interesting in that they don't simply want to plunder and burn Orak, but destroy its way of life because they realize it will one day challenge their own.

If Barone has a weakness, it's the odd mixture of names. He has some authentic Sumerian names like Sisuthros, Adad and Ningal, mixed with others like Trella, Alexar and Bantor which just don't quite seem to fit. There's also some really odd ones like Subutai (Mongolian) and Thutmose (Egyptian) which are also out of place and a little jarring. I wish he had stuck to the Sumerian names, but that's just me.

There is a sequel coming next year.
"It is more than a mortal sea. Your hands are red with blood and you follow a red sea-path, yet the fault is not wholly with you. Almighty God, when will the reign of blood cease?"

Turlogh shook his head. "Not so long as the race lasts."


--- The Dark Man, by Robert E. Howard