Jump to content


Photo

"Spear And Fang"-- R E H Story Of The Month


  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#21 docpod

docpod

    Fungus Killer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Waterford, PA

Posted 13 April 2012 - 12:04 AM

I read it about 30 years ago when I got the brief 1970s revival of WEIRD TALES. Moskowitz reprinted it. The story is a pastiche of Paul L. Anderson's caveman stories that had been in ARGOSY in the early 20s. Howard's take is faster and to the point. WEIRD TALES had a run of cave man stories in the middle 1920s. Farnsworth Wright said he rejected a fair number of stories with cavemen and dinosaurs together. Guess he would have rejected A. Conan Doyle's THE LOST WORLD had it been submitted to WT.

Morgan
Ignorance can be cured. Stupid is forever.

#22 Konorg

Konorg

    Mauler of Shadizar

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 638 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pictland

Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:35 AM

I read it about 30 years ago when I got the brief 1970s revival of WEIRD TALES. Moskowitz reprinted it. The story is a pastiche of Paul L. Anderson's caveman stories that had been in ARGOSY in the early 20s. Howard's take is faster and to the point. WEIRD TALES had a run of cave man stories in the middle 1920s. Farnsworth Wright said he rejected a fair number of stories with cavemen and dinosaurs together. Guess he would have rejected A. Conan Doyle's THE LOST WORLD had it been submitted to WT.

Morgan

True but i find a lot oif the Cave men with dinosaur style stories to be really awesome.


The aveage civilized man is never fully alive;he is burdened with masses of atrophied tisse and useless matter.Life flickers feebily in him;his senses sre dull and torpid...In devloping his intellect he has sacrificed far more then he realizes."

#23 Hawkbrother

Hawkbrother

    Adventurer

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 286 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rappahannock County, Va

Posted 17 April 2012 - 05:58 PM

The Lancer Wolfshead - I remember that one. Some of Howard's greatest stories that did not feature Conan, Solomon Kane, and other of his more well-known heroes.
Especially remember Horror from the Mound, Howard's take on vampires- and how some critics complained because he did not follow "accepted" vampire lore. For that matter, he did the same with Wolfshead and werewolves.

#24 theagenes

theagenes

    WarLord

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,428 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida

Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:03 PM

I read it about 30 years ago when I got the brief 1970s revival of WEIRD TALES. Moskowitz reprinted it. The story is a pastiche of Paul L. Anderson's caveman stories that had been in ARGOSY in the early 20s. Howard's take is faster and to the point. WEIRD TALES had a run of cave man stories in the middle 1920s. Farnsworth Wright said he rejected a fair number of stories with cavemen and dinosaurs together. Guess he would have rejected A. Conan Doyle's THE LOST WORLD had it been submitted to WT.

Morgan


For those who haven't read Paul Anderson's cave man stories that inspired Spear & Fang, here is "The Cave that Swims on Water." Just scroll down to Anderson.

http://pulpgen.com/p...t_by_author.php

Check out my blog: An Age Undreamed Of

#25 Jason A.

Jason A.

    Adventurer

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 404 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 January 2014 - 11:34 AM

 

Seemed like the right thing to do with REH's birthday this week.


Pulp Crazy - http://pulpcrazy.com


#26 deuce

deuce

    The OG of "Psychotic Maladjustment"

  • Moderators
  • 14,107 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Serpent-haunted SEK, beside the Lake of the Mound

Posted 25 January 2014 - 01:38 PM

 

Seemed like the right thing to do with REH's birthday this week.

 

 

Cool on you, JA.  B)  

 

The yarn is worth looking at. A lot to discern about REH and his influences therein.


Support the Robert E. Howard Foundation. It helps you and Robert E. Howard's legacy.


#27 Jason A.

Jason A.

    Adventurer

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 404 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 January 2014 - 08:08 PM

 

 

Seemed like the right thing to do with REH's birthday this week.

 

 

Cool on you, JA.   B)

 

The yarn is worth looking at. A lot to discern about REH and his influences therein.

 

 

 

This got me hooked on REH. While the first REH story I listened to was "Cairn on the Headland", thanks to David Dredge's (sp) awesome Dial P For Pulp Podcast, Spear & Fang is the first story I actually read.

 

Looking at this from a historical perspective, I'm surprised Weird Tales accepted it due to it being historical fiction more or less. There isn't anything really weird about it, save the time period I guess. Perhaps they were impressed enough with Howard's writing to accept it, even though it wasn't a typical weird tale. Just looking at this from a pulp perspective Spear & Fang would have been more at home in an action or possibly even a jungle pulp.

 

I'm glad it ended up in Weird Tales though. This and a story called "Tiger Cat" are the only two Weird Tales I've read that do not contain supernatural elements.

 

I guess they were weird enough without them.


Pulp Crazy - http://pulpcrazy.com


#28 docpod

docpod

    Fungus Killer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Waterford, PA

Posted 25 January 2014 - 09:43 PM

WEIRD TALES had all sorts of fiction that was not necessarily fantastic or supernatural. There is a three part Murray Leinster serial about people from Daghestan in the Caucasus Mountains moving to upstate New York. A favorite little story of mine is an animal story about a brown bat. It reminded me of F. St. Mars animal stories that ran in ARGOSY and ADVENTURE.

 There were other caveman stories in WEIRD TALES. Lovecraft's friend Clifford Eddy had two cavemen stories that predated "Spear and Fang."

 

Morgan


Ignorance can be cured. Stupid is forever.

#29 Jason A.

Jason A.

    Adventurer

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 404 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 January 2014 - 11:32 PM

WEIRD TALES had all sorts of fiction that was not necessarily fantastic or supernatural. There is a three part Murray Leinster serial about people from Daghestan in the Caucasus Mountains moving to upstate New York. A favorite little story of mine is an animal story about a brown bat. It reminded me of F. St. Mars animal stories that ran in ARGOSY and ADVENTURE.

 There were other caveman stories in WEIRD TALES. Lovecraft's friend Clifford Eddy had two cavemen stories that predated "Spear and Fang."

 

Morgan

 

 

Cool, thanks I'll have to check those out. Especially the one about the bat. I like stories with animal protagonists.


Pulp Crazy - http://pulpcrazy.com


#30 deuce

deuce

    The OG of "Psychotic Maladjustment"

  • Moderators
  • 14,107 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Serpent-haunted SEK, beside the Lake of the Mound

Posted 12 May 2015 - 05:16 PM

As has been noted before, this yarn was probably inspired (mostly) by Paul L. Anderson:

 

 

http://www.rehupa.co..._a.htm#Anderson, Paul L.

 

Here's Rusty Burke's take:

 

This author is not mentioned by REH, but his work was clearly the inspiration for Howard's very early (ca. 1923), handwritten poem, "Am-ra the Ta-an" (incomplete) and the fragment "The Tale of Am-ra," as well as his first published story, "Spear and Fang."  Anderson wrote a series of novelettes, appearing in Argosy, about a tribe of Cro-Magnons called the Ta-an.  Howard's "Am-ra" fragments are brief, but even so share some common elements with Anderson's series: the hero is both a warrior and an artist, he is exiled due to a clash with the tribe's priests, he fights against a race of black men, the Ta-an are referred to as "the people of the caves," etc.  Such similarities seem unlikely to be coincidental.  Anderson's Ta-an series consisted of "The Son of the Red God" (Argosy, 31 January 1920), "The Lord of the Winged Death" (Argosy, 6 March 1920), "The Cave That Swims on the Water" (Argosy, 8 May 1920), "The Master of Magic" (Argosy, 17 July 1920), "The Wings of the Snow" (Argosy, 28 August 1920), and "Up From the Abyss" (Argosy, 22 March 1924).   [It is possible, but I am unsure, that this is Paul Lewis Anderson (1880-1956), author of a number of photography books (and a noted photographer), as well as such novels as A Slave of Catiline (1930), For Freedom and For Gaul (1931), The Sword of Sergestus (1932), etc.]


Support the Robert E. Howard Foundation. It helps you and Robert E. Howard's legacy.