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Edgar Rice Burroughs: REH Influence and Master of Adventure


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#281 Michael Miko

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:13 AM


I did a search on the forums and didn't find any post about this... so here goes.

These podcasts are pretty darn good. There are book readings of Tarzan, John Carter and more. David Stifels is the narrator and he does a good job. Its a good way to hear the books while surfing the web or in my case while I work. Please try it out and see if you enjoy it.

http://marsbooks.libsyn.com/


Good stuff! Thanks, Michael. :D


Welcome Deuce... I just discovered those podcast yesterday on the facebook group page of the Edgar Rice Burroughs - Facebook Forum (http://www.facebook....567716/members/).
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#282 deuce

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 07:46 AM



Edgar Rice Burroughs was likewise sympathetic with the Apaches and protrayed them as rounded human beings, not movie stereotypes. This was probably because during his cavalry years in Arizona he got to know genuine Apaches and saw what they really were. He didn't downplay their cruelty, but he depicted them as people loving and humorous with their own families and bands, but fierce when dealing with their enemies. They were such a tiny group that this was the only way they could retain their independence, and Burroughs recognized that.



I guess at this stage I would have to ask, who and what is your benchmark for 'enlightened'.
I mean enlightened compared to the other pulp writers, or Kroeber or Gifford or Lowie or even Llewllyn Loud for example?

Best, MEH


Thank you SO much, Mark E. (MEH) Hall.

Your question raises the basic question: Should thinkers/intellectuals of an earlier era be held to account for "inaccurate" views?

By that, I mean: Should Aristotle be thrown out because he thought comets/meteors were "atmospheric phenomena"? Should Isaac Newton be ignored because he believed in astrology?

There seems to be a disconnect regarding "errors" in sociology (the least exact of "sciences") and physics. Galileo didn't have to be 100% right. Apparently, Burroughs (and Howard) did.

Seems unfair. Especially since the two were just writers. Galileo and Newton were avowed scientists.

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#283 deuce

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:30 PM

Was looking up the commemorative Burroughs stamp that came out last August. Thought y'all might appreciate the link:


http://about.usps.co...12/pr12_094.htm

The Postmaster General is a lifelong ERB fan.

B)

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#284 Keith J Taylor

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 01:43 PM

OK, greywho -- I am with you a hundred per cent about THE OUTLAW OF TORN being a highly enjoyable historical. I liked it immensely the first time I read it and I've been planning to read it again when I get the chance. (Which pretty much means after I've read THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO

#285 Keith J Taylor

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 01:55 PM

WHAT HAPPENED THERE? My computer glitched on me and posted the above before I'd finished. Yes. Well. I really liked OUTLAW OF TORN and I like the fact that Frazetta did a dynamite cover for it, mounted galloping knight with sword held forward and scarlet cloak streaming in the wind, a painting as good as his Conan covers. The outlaw in the novel is a kidnapped legitimate son of England's king who ends by leading a thousand desperate wolfsheads and several grim captains -- a Spaniard "without bowels of compassion" and Edwild, a fierce bitter former serf whose mother was burned as a witch, among them. I think it was Philip Jose Farmer who suggested that Burroughs was conceding to the moral requirements of the time by hiding the truth, that the mighty outlaw would 'really' have been an ILLEGITIMATE son of the king. You couldn't say "illegitimate", much less "bastard", in popular adventure fiction then. Or even in serious drama. Shaw's MAJOR BARBARA was unable to say on the public stage that the heirs of the Undershaft firm were adopted illegitimate kids. They had to be called "foundlings". But, agreed, OUTLAW is a great read and worthy of Frazetta's cover.

#286 deuce

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 03:00 PM

Our own Ryan Harvey reviews The Oakdale Affair, which is sort of a sequel to ERB's "Mucker duology":

http://www.blackgate...erb/#more-45349

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#287 deuce

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:16 PM

I happened to hear the Supergrass song, "The Rebel in You", on the radio a little bit ago. Here's the section of the lyrics that caught my ear:

 

You're in the land that time forgot

I wouldn't wait for you

Now it's happened again

So why don't you come back?


ERB came up with "the land that time forgot". It got me to thinking about other "memes" he originated. With a nod to Wells, I'm pretty sure that "little green men from Mars" had its origin in Burroughs' giant "Green Men of Mars". I'm sure there are others out there, but I've been up WAY too long.

 

Kaor! 


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#288 deuce

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 08:20 AM

A good review (by our own Kalel21) of the Pellucidar novel, Back to the Stone Age:

 

 

http://comicsradio.b...o the Stone Age


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#289 deuce

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 05:38 AM

New ERB pastiche anthology from Baen!

 

http://www.baenebook..._utmk=252233226

 

And...

 

http://www.baenebook..._utmk=252233226

 

The intro, from Mike Resnick and Bob Garcia:

 

"Welcome to the worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs—and we do mean worlds.

Everyone knows about his most popular creation, of course. Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle, starred in twenty-two books during ERB’s lifetime, and two more that were published after his death. He’s been starring in movies since the silent era beginning back in 1918, he’s had his own TV show, he was even the star of a Broadway musical and he had his own long-running comic strip and comic book.

But ERB’s reputation doesn’t rest solely with Tarzan. He also created the almost-as-influential Mars series, in which John Carter, an Earthman who becomes the Warlord of Mars, and his friends starred in ten books while Burroughs was alive, and part of an eleventh that was published, along with a John Carter novella written by his sons, after Burroughs died—and these books influenced such writers as Leigh Brackett, Otis Adelbert Kline, Lin Carter, and many, many others.

Not bad for one literary lifetime.

But there’s more. Lots more.

Not content with setting adventures on Mars, Burroughs created another hero, Carson Napier, a kind of Wrong-Way Corrigan of space, who set out for Mars, somehow wound up on Venus, and stayed there for four books while ERB was alive, and part of a fifth that was published posthumously.

And for those who didn’t want to fare that far afield for their fantastic adventures, Burroughs created Pellucidar, the strange world that exists at the Earth’s Core. It was discovered by David Innes and Abner Perry, but eventually even Tarzan made it down there, and seven books were devoted to it.

Forty-five books about his four worlds. That would be a half a dozen careers for most writers, but Burroughs was just getting started.

He served in the cavalry in Arizona, and it turned up in his two novels about Shoz-Dijiji, the War Chief of the Apaches. (And he gave equal time to the other side, with The Deputy Sheriff of Comanche County and The Outlaw of Hell’s Bend.)

He was back in space—deep space—for his tale of Poloda, a planet that exists Beyond the Farthest Star.

And he came a little closer to home with his novel, The Moon Maid.

For those who like their heroes to wear more than a loin cloth and to look and act like you and me, he wrote The Mucker.

There was more, of course, but these constitute his major worlds and his major achievements, and we’re proud to present at least one story about each of them.

Edgar Rice Burroughs was, and is, a national treasure. Tarzan became an instant icon with his first appearance in the October, 1912 issue of All-Story Magazine. By the 1920s, the best-selling American author in the world was not Hemingway or Fitzgerald, but Edgar Rice Burroughs. He became a success at something that had eluded Mark Twain and others: publishing and distributing his own books. Two cities—Tarzana, California and Tarzan, Texas—are named for his most famous character. More than a decade after his death in 1950, when most of his titles had fallen out of print, there was a massive paperback revival, and he was a bestseller all over again. Fanzines arose that were devoted exclusively to his work, and the Burroughs Bibliophiles have been convening regularly since the early 1960s.

When we finally decided to create an anthology of original stories, using his characters, we approached some of the top science fiction and fantasy writers in the field, and we were overwhelmed by their enthusiastic response. Most had been waiting their whole lives to write a Burroughs story, and now that we’d received permission from Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., nothing was going to stop them.

And nothing did.

So read, enjoy, and marvel at some new takes on the many worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs."


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#290 THE KID

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 01:36 PM

Cave Girl, Cave Man,  and Savage P. are three of my favorites of ERB.

 

51slKfzspgL._AA220_.jpg

 

Introduction

 

Edgar Rice Burroughs' seventh novel The Cave Girl was begun the second month of 1913. The All-Story magazine published in three parts (July, August and September) of that year. The following year Burroughs wrote the second part The Cave Man which All-Story Weekly published in four parts starting March 31, 1917. The first edition by A. C. McClurg was released in March of 1925 and Gosset & Dunlap issued the initial reprint edition the following year.

 

PART ONE: THE CAVE GIRL

 

I. Flotsam

 

A great wave washes Waldo Emerson Smith-Jones from the deck of a steamer. Fate deposits him on the beach of a jungle-edged shore. A Boston intellectual, Waldo, who is emaciated and in poor health, is terrified of the shadows, especially at night. Subsisting on fruits by day, he is convinced some creature stalks him each evening. His mind cannot take the strain and, in a fit of madness, Waldo runs screaming toward the shadow and chases it into the interior. The shadow vanishes near a cliff. Overcome, both physically and mentally, Waldo collapses. Awakening next day, the madness has subsided. Waldo uses a club to knock fruits from a tree. Later he comes face to face with a savage.

 

II. The Wild People

 

Waldo runs toward a cliff with a dozen savages pursuing. Clawing his way aloft, Waldo inadvertently sends one of the cave men tumbling down, then moments later clubs one with his heavy stick. During the lull Waldo meets a half-naked girl. At her mimed suggestion he bombards the attackers with stones, eventually ending hostilities by dropping a 50 pound mortar upon a man.

 

III. The Little Eden

 

The cavemen wait below. Waldo begins communication with the girl, who by sign and gesture, says they will descend for food and drink at nightfall. Near midnight, as the couple creeps through the forest, a caveman awakes. Though Waldo wishes to flee, at the girl's cry he turns and breaks the caveman's arm. The couple then elude pursuit. Reaching a secluded valley, Waldo learns swimming, woodcraft, tolerance for nudity, and language over a ten day period. He learns of the girl's trouble with undesired suitors at home and of Nagoola, the black panther. She intends to return with Waldo as her protector. Nagoola visits them, but departs without attacking.

 

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#291 deuce

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 12:45 AM

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Edgar Rice Burroughs died 64yrs ago today, leaving behind nearly 100 novels and almost incalculable influence.

 

In literature, he could (and can) boast fans from from Gore Vidal and Ray Bradbury to Robert E. Howard, Fritz Leiber, Michael Moorcock and SM Stirling (and countless others to this day).

 

George Lucas, Robert Rodriguez and JJ Abrams (and many others) are all fans of the Man From Tarzana.

 

In the sciences, Carl Sagan and Jane Goodall both stated that reading ERB changed their lives and set them on the road to their careers.

 

On top of that, Burroughs was (IMO), simply one of the best storytellers (and possessed of one of the greatest imaginations) ever.

 

Check out the Official ERB site:

 

http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com/

 

LOADS of cool stuff on there.   B)

 

KAOR!

 

frazetta3-barsoom.jpg


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