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Kull - The Fabulous Warrior King (Bantam)


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#1 Strom

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Posted 20 June 2009 - 11:00 PM

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Bantam
Year : September 1978
Book No. : 0-553-12019-0-1
Edition : 1st
Format : Paperback
Pages : 190
Cover art : Lou Feck

Contents:

"Introduction" by Andrew J. Offut
"Prolog"
"Exile of Atlantis"
"The Shadow Kingdom"
"The Altar and the Scorpion"
"Delcardes' Cat"
"The Skull of Silence"
"By This Axe I Rule!"
"The Striking of the Gong"
"Swords of the Purple Kingdom"
"The Mirrors of Tuzun Thune"
"The King and the Oak" (poem)
"The Black City" (fragment)
"Untitled" (unfinished)
"Untitled" (unfinished)
"Epilog"

Notes:

Removes editing changes made by Lin Carter for the Lancer edition.
Contains a map of Kull's world drawn by Tim Kirk.
Cover has a fold-out poster.

Info from Howard Works website:
howardworks.com/kullm.htm


Had an great day book hunting today - found this old Kull book. I don't think the use of the "fabulous' adjective has aged well. :D Cool poster fold out by Lou Feck and the Kirk map is something I have wanted for awhile. I liked the introduction by Mr. Offutt - it dispenses with the scholarly approach to Kull and instead unabashedly lists why Kull is his favorite REH character over Conan, Cormac and the rest. I've read many intros by many different people and can never remember reading such an amazing and simplistic tribute as the one Andrew J. Offutt gives REH in this intro when he glosses over REH's death and instead proclaims:

REH lives.


Kudos to Offutt - he's absolutely right. B)

Edited by Strom, 21 June 2009 - 11:44 AM.

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#2 amster

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Posted 20 June 2009 - 11:42 PM

That's definately a cool book. I still have my copy from '78. :)
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--Robert E. Howard to Harold Preece, ca. June 1928--

#3 Kane

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Posted 21 June 2009 - 04:12 AM

That's definately a cool book. I still have my copy from '78. :)

Same here!
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#4 S-Shield

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 05:05 AM

That's a great cover. I love the red cape.
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#5 deuce

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 05:30 AM

Still got my copy. :) Gotta love the beautiful (if inaccurate) map of the Thurian Age world. B)

IMO, Offutt was probably best suited writing Kull pastiches (as opposed to Conan or CMA). Too bad he never got the chance.

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#6 THE KID

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 10:03 PM

I just found this book at my mom and pop store and grabbed it quick as lightening!! It's in great shape = Near Mint. The front cover opens up from the inside and comprises a neat looking mini poster. The poster is offered for sale. I'd buy it if it was still available.

The introduction is really good by Offutt. Offutt is a huge fan of Robert E. Howard and it shows in his intro which is so good I'm almost tempted to type all six pages so others can read.
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#7 Tex

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 10:55 PM

Offutt once told me, back at CoastCon 84, that he REALLY wanted to do the tale of Kull's early life. He mentioned it elsewhere in print as well, so he was serious about it. Pity the rights holders of the time WEREN'T. I just wish someone at Paradox would take a chance and get him a contract for it.

The introduction is really good by Offutt. Offutt is a huge fan of Robert E. Howard and it shows in his intro which is so good I'm almost tempted to type all six pages so others can read.


If you're of a mind to, then please do! It needs to be more widely read.

Tex
(same with other intros to various Howard books--lost treasures out there in need of rediscovery)

#8 THE KID

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 02:16 AM

Ok Tex :) Intro by Offutt

QUOTE

"Kulra Thoom...Tuzun Thune...Brule the spear slayer...Thulsa Doom. And...Kull.

The names alone are exciting, evocative of a time much removed from ours; of other societies and other customs in other places. They create an image of stone walls surrounding stone cities capped by domes and turrets and thronged by people in tunics and robes of irrepressible hues--and surely very little clothing at all, among the women. And even less adorns the shrinking virgins and proudly strutting pleasuremaids on platforms from which a turbaned or burnoosed man loudly cries their attrributes to potential buyers whose eyes blaze. The sounds of exotic languages and creaking chariot wheels ride the air. Here and there loft temple to the gods of many peoples, amid well-secured keeps behind whose girm walls wizards plot and hatch their necromantic spells.

And everywhere are burly men, scarred men, male men with swords across their back or on left hips--daggers on right--men in armor of bronze of iron chain that flashes in the bright sun of a long-ago world.

So it was in the Valusia created by Robert E. Howard, maker of magic, and in the cities of its neighbors among the Seven Empires.

Over it all presided Kull.

Willing exile of Atlantis he was, a man condemned for showing kindness to a victim of the mob--by slaying her swiftly. Such was kindness in the time of Kull, just as it was much, much later in the time of that first Caesar, who gained a name for mercy by ordering his men to slit the throats of a group of crucified lawbreakers.

Kull is my favorite among the lusty, brawny, brawling protagonists created and launched by Robert E. Howard. Each leaves behind a wake of scarlet, whether he be Conon or Solomon Kane, Kull or Cormac mac Art, Bran Mak Morn or Francis X. Gordon.

His own dripping blade proclaimed Kull king of Valusia. Only it held the crown against the plotting nobles, priests of the overthrown serpent-god, and sorcereres who sought to topple the brawny barbarian. Yet long ago he sat the Topac Throne in the Tower of Splendor in purple-towered Valusia, land of enchantment, City of Wonder.

I'm going to assume that you know about Conan and Kull and Valusia and the Hyborian and Pre-Cataclysmic ages. I'm going to assume that you know of him we refer to as REH, who had the Magic: Robert Ervin Howard of Texas who wrote an incredibly large number of stories--and yet all too few--before his suicide at age thirty, for reasons you can read elsewhere. REH lives. Homer lives, who began heroic fantasy; Dumas lives, who carried it on, in a way (and after Thulsa Doom of Valusia, Richeliue ismy very favorite villain); Burroughs lives; Howard lives. There can be no death for Helen or Hektor or Odysseus, for D'Artagnan or Athos, or...Kull the King.

There are several reasons for my liking Kull best--aye, better than Conan.

I do think the long novelette "The Shadow Kingdom" and the shorter "Delcardes Cat" and the ever shorter--and weirdly original --"The Skull of Silence" are among REH's very best works. They are, simply put, terrific stories. Lord, could the man tell stories! First published in 1929, "The Shadow Kingdome" is still a winner, combining mystery and splendor, wonder and shivery horror and clangorous battle, treacherous guile and straightforward striding--and hacking and slashing.

Kull is peculiarly human.

UNQUOTE

There is more but I'm getting tired typing. I could never be a writer. I'll finish up on the next post

Thanks.

Edited by THE KID, 25 February 2013 - 02:18 AM.

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#9 THE KID

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 12:58 AM

Ok - Here's the rest of Offutt's great intro :)

QUOTE

The guy breathes in these pages. Kull ate and drank and cursed, lost his head and his temper, and I know dam' well he belched. A rather introspective man he is, seeking meaning--and a huge barbarian the while, sitting a throne as if it were his bauble, pouncing like a bright-eyed child on each new curiosity and diversion. The cares and duties of a monach are forgotten while Kull indulges himself and loses himself. He is readily diverted, unless he is rushing o save a friend or seeking vengeance. (And no villain gets off on a technicality. Nor is there any appeal. Scabbard justice reigns.)

This Herculean man with the sword-steel eyes and sword-scarred face and hands is readily, boyishly drawn into fascination with such as the bemusing cat of Delcardes, the strange, soul-sucking mirrors of Tuzun Thune...and then he is wholly absorbed and entranced by them-and at last enrapt to the exclusion of all else. Aye, mighty is King Kull--and more than once a clearer head has to save his bacon, for he is ever the boy. He is ever human.

Too, he is ever all too ready to go off alone, as to the Forbidden Lake and the eerily strange inhabitants of the Enchanted Land at its bottom. Then there was the time, as men said in the wineshops of Valusian, wagging their heads and making sure none of the undefeatable Red Slayers overheard, that ol' impetuous Kull rode clear across dthe continent after one woman of the nobility, and her nothing to him; she'd but piqued royal pride by fleeing her own land with a foreigh lover. Terrible, ridiculous behavior for a king!

But--who can identify with the perfect Arthur invented by Sir Walter Scott and others? Our king, the big barbarian, the people of Valusia must have vaunted, is human; he even loses his head and does the illogical and ridiculously dangerous...even as do you and I, stranger. Say naught here against our Kull!

The man even had heart. He shows it in these stories-some of them. He's partial to young lovers, and even smashes ancient tablets of the Law for them, dangerously declaring words to be echoed later in history by lesser men: I am the Law! I am the State!

Nor was Kull such a loner as the surlier Conan. Ka-Nu of Pictdom and civilized, conscientious Tu are ever hovering as advisers to the king. Pictish Brule the Spear-slayer, dark and blue-eyed (aye, Howard even Celticized this Pict!) with the ritual warriors' scars, is the king's constant companion, adviser, chess-playing friend, sword-comrade--and rescuer.

(Sword? Oh, aye, there's ever one at Kull's lean hip, even when he restlessly sits his ermined throne or strides the torchlit halls of his castle in crown and rich, gem-encrusted robes. Yet it is the ax he prefers; the dread bloody wedge of sharpened iron on a club, a savage basher of skulls and crusher of chests, rather than the more civilized slash-and-stage weapon of the sword.)

Kulll the King. King Kull.

They asked me to write this because, boyish as Kull, I am helplessly a fan of REH and have love in me for the big barbarian king from Atlantis. They know I want to write a novel about him, to wallow in the Pe-Catacylsmic world.

King Kull! Aye ye dog, ye lucky dog of a reader! If you're about to read these tales for the first time, I smile, for I remember, and I can identify with you, and feel empathy with you, and ...yes, even envy you!

Vive Kull! Long live the King!

--andrew j offutt, fan

UNQUOTE

There ye have it and now it's off to the store to find more REH and Offutt Kull books and bash with a sledgehammer any dogs who get in my way!

http://en.wikipedia....ndrew_J._Offutt

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Edited by THE KID, 26 February 2013 - 01:01 AM.

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#10 thedarkman

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 03:36 PM

Thank you so much for taking the time to type and post that intro. I have two editions of Kull; the Del Rey and the Sphere, but I do not have this volume. Andrew's words echo my feelings about Howard's work in general, and he really deserves the chance to try his hand at Kull. I think he would do just fine.

#11 THE KID

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 01:00 AM

You're welcome.

 

There's one book available on Abebooks.com for $7.95 + $6.00 shipping and if you want it better hurry because once word gets out someone might beat you to it.  Good luck!  http://www.abebooks.... offutt&kn=kull


Edited by THE KID, 27 February 2013 - 01:01 AM.

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#12 Tex

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 06:33 AM

Thanks for taking the time and trouble to transcribe the intro, Brudda!

 

Tex

(still shaking his head at the iggits who didn't get Offutt to write that book)



#13 THE KID

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 03:27 AM

Tex :) You're welcome.


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#14 THE KID

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 08:20 PM

Look what I found on Ebay today! Can buy outright for $150.  27 days left.  If we could go back in time to 1978 it would cost $10. Mail check to New York. Does anyone have this poster? If you type in Robert E. Howard on Ebay today this poster is currently on page 24 half way down. No bids yet. It's a beauty! I didn't see any creases at all as it was in a tube! The book is on same page just a few below this poster! Wow!!

 

 

$(KGrHqN,!lsE65gjKfC1BO59VlMlnQ~~60_1.JP

 

 

You are bidding on an original ROBERT E. HOWARD lithograph done by LOU FECK entitled KULL THE FABULOUS WARRIOR KING. This lithograph was published by Bantam Books in 1978.

 

The poster measures 24" x 20" and is in excellent condition.

 

Each poster, print and or lithograph has been placed flat on a white archival board and mounted with archival corners and then temporarily shrink wrapped for preservation and protection. The postage quote for each item is for us to dismount the artwork and ship it rolled in a tube. 


Edited by THE KID, 10 March 2013 - 08:31 PM.

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