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Poul Anderson: Fantasy Author, REH Fan


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#1 Orkin

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Posted 26 August 2003 - 07:05 PM

Has anyone read the series of novels by Poul Anderson entitled The Last Viking? Apparently its a trilogy on the life of historical Viking Harald Hadraada, and is said to be Conan-ish.... :huh:
? ?When I can not stand alone, it will be time to die,? he mumbled, through mashed lips. ?But I?d like a flagon of wine.?
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#2 Kane

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Posted 27 August 2003 - 11:23 AM

Any additional information?

ie; Titles of the individual novels.
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#3 Orkin

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Posted 27 August 2003 - 05:28 PM

Sign of the Raven: Harald's early years
The Golden Horn: his service in Byzantium
Road of the Sea Horse: events leading up to Stamford Bridge
? ?When I can not stand alone, it will be time to die,? he mumbled, through mashed lips. ?But I?d like a flagon of wine.?
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#4 Kane

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Posted 27 August 2003 - 06:15 PM

Sign of the Raven: Harald's early years
The Golden Horn: his service in Byzantium
Road of the Sea Horse: events leading up to Stamford Bridge

Thank you.

Next stop, Amazon.com.
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#5 Crom

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Posted 27 August 2003 - 10:41 PM

Sign of the Raven: Harald's early years
The Golden Horn: his service in Byzantium
Road of the Sea Horse: events leading up to Stamford Bridge

Thank you.

Next stop, Amazon.com.

Indeed. I thought I had a handle on most of Anderson's work. Always learn something new...

#6 Jason Durall

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Posted 02 September 2003 - 10:22 PM

Has anyone read the series of novels by Poul Anderson entitled The Last Viking? Apparently its a trilogy on the life of historical Viking Harald Hadraada, and is said to be Conan-ish....  :huh:

I've read and enjoyed them quite a bit.

I don't know if I'd call them Conan-esque, but they are very enjoyable. There was something about Vikings which brought out the best in Poul Anderson's work.

#7 deuce

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 07:51 PM

Poul Anderson would be 83 years old today. If you ever read a Kane or Elric story and thought, "That kicks a$$!", some of that is owed to Poul (MM and KEW both said so). Robert E. Howard never wrote a single story with a historical "Viking" as the main protagonist (unless one counts an alleged "Boealf" story he wrote as a child). Poul did so ten times over. Without novels like The Broken Sword, S&S/heroic fantasy would be entirely different.

I wrote up a tribute to Poul Anderson here: http://www.thecimmerian.com/?p=7690

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#8 PaulMc

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 08:12 PM

I wrote up a tribute to Poul Anderson here: http://www.thecimmerian.com/?p=7690

Poul wrote a trilogy of novels about Harald Hardraada. The thread about that can be found here:

http://www.conan.com...ch=1

Heck of a writer from all I've heard. Need to get more of his stuff under my belt.

I notice you used the cover of Swordsmen in the Sky, I assume he had a story in that?

I only recently became aware of that anthology, and I want! :P

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#9 deuce

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 08:56 PM

I notice you used the cover of Swordsmen in the Sky, I assume he had a story in that?

I only recently became aware of that anthology, and I want! Posted Image


Hey Paul! Poul's Swordsman of Lost Terra is in that Donald A. Wollheim (the man who really "made" Conan, if anybody) anthology. Pretty strong line-up, in my opinion. Posted Image

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#10 deuce

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 02:02 AM

Al Harron weighs in on Poul Anderson here:


http://www.thecimmerian.com/?p=7706


B)

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#11 amster

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 02:29 AM

I've only read three Poul Anderson novels; The Broken Sword, The Last Crusade, and Conan the Rebel. I'd say that the Conan pastiche was my least favorite of the three. The Last Crusade was ludacrous, but highly enjoyable. The Broken Sword just flat out kicked a$$.
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#12 deuce

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 03:06 AM

I've only read three Poul Anderson novels; The Broken Sword, The Last Crusade, and Conan the Rebel. I'd say that the Conan pastiche was my least favorite of the three. The Last Crusade was ludacrous, but highly enjoyable. The Broken Sword just flat out kicked a$$.



Hey Amster! I wouldn't really disagree with you on any of those points. Poul gave "Rebel" his best shot, but he just wasn't suited for that one (I think KEW or Keith Taylor would've done a better job). I think Poul would've been great writing tales of the first Hyborians. The High Crusade was obviously a novel that Anderson wrote just to have fun (though there's plenty of good, sword-slingin' action therein). I think REH would've enjoyed it. As you (and the vast majority of those who've read it) have said, The Broken Sword is a classic.

Just keep in mind that Poul wrote a LOT more than that. Posted Image I've found that I enjoy Anderson's fiction more as the years go by. A very cool ol' boy.

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#13 Almuric

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 05:23 AM

Yes, "Swordsman of Lost Terra" is very good. Back from the days when fantasy had to be written with science-fictional fig leafs to make it acceptable. How things have changed.
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#14 Ironhand

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 08:26 AM

He also wrote "Call me Joe", elements of which were cribbed for the about-to-be-released movie "Avatar".
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#15 deuce

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 08:59 AM

He also wrote "Call me Joe", elements of which were cribbed for the about-to-be-released movie "Avatar".


Al Harron talks about that here: http://www.thecimmerian.com/?p=7706

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#16 Libaax

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 06:20 PM

I have read The Broken Sword which is brilliant and Planet of No Return a solid SF book.

His interest in Norse themed stories is natural seeing his heritage and a big plus for me who find those kind of stories very interesting. Since i have grown up among Swedes.

I will get the other Norse books he wrote for sure.

Next I'm hunting for His Flandry books that sound fun. He is a new fav of mine that i plan to read much more of. I like the fact his Broken Sword was written in very fine singing prose and his SF stories are different in writing style.

Edited by Libaax, 26 November 2009 - 06:21 PM.


#17 Mikey_C

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 08:56 PM

I read the Broken Sword many moons ago and agree that its great. It must have been the second edition, which I understand was extensively rewritten. Michael Moorcock very much prefers the first version (this is now in print from Gollancz). I am planning to get hold of this, but I'm just wondering whether other people share Mr Moorcock's view.
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#18 docpod

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 09:51 PM

I have both editions and went through them five years ago. I could not see all that much difference between the two. Yeah, some sentences are rewritten but the plot remained the same.

Morgan

I read the Broken Sword many moons ago and agree that its great. It must have been the second edition, which I understand was extensively rewritten. Michael Moorcock very much prefers the first version (this is now in print from Gollancz). I am planning to get hold of this, but I'm just wondering whether other people share Mr Moorcock's view.


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#19 Malak

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 06:11 PM

I read the Broken Sword many moons ago and agree that its great. It must have been the second edition, which I understand was extensively rewritten. Michael Moorcock very much prefers the first version (this is now in print from Gollancz). I am planning to get hold of this, but I'm just wondering whether other people share Mr Moorcock's view.



I haven't read the re-written edition myself, but I have yet to meet someone who prefers it to the original version.

Here's an interesting article that sums up the differences:
http://www.blackgate...e-broken-sword/

#20 Libaax

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 09:35 PM

I read Gollanz Fantasy Masterworks version and i guess i was lucky since i didnt know of the older,re-written version.