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Keith J. Taylor: Award-winning fantasy author/blogger (and REH fan)


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#21 deuce

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Posted 27 December 2010 - 09:10 AM

Over at his Yahoo group, Keith talks about his upcoming Kamose novel...

"I'm still working on the novel about Kamose, magician of Egypt, the sorcerer featured in the series of stories I had published in WEIRD TALES between 1999 and 2003, with titles like "Haunted Shadows" and "The Emerald Scarab." In the short stories, Kamose is the Archpriest of Anubis, the jackal-headed god of cemeteries, embalming and funerary rites, the bitter and hated rival of the priesthood of Thoth. The stories take place in the brief reign of Pharaoh Setekh-Nekht, and then at the beginning of the reign of his son, Rameses III. That is to say, approximately in 1205 BCE. Kamose has extended his life span quite extraordinarily, and no-one except himself knows how he achieved this any longer. He's outlived all those human beings who ever did know.

The novel harks back to a time a century before, the reign of Seti I, in that Pharaoh's fifth regnal year. Kamose is then thirty-six, and the novel ? working title SNAKE BENEATH THE THRONE ? set in Damascus, makes known how Kamose became quasi-immortal, with sidelights on the Hebrews, Moses, their early, unsuccessful, attempt at an invasion of Caanan, and the real nature of the serpent of Eden.

Kamose has a varied and eventful career behind him already. As a youth he was neither a magician nor formidable. In fact he was an unworldly scholar and junior priest. He had yearnings to become great in magic, though, and a taste for forbidden writings on arcane and sorcerous lore, which he was always seeking in the indicted sections of temple libraries. He was pretty much an ancient Egyptian version of Lovecraft's New England scholars and warlocks who discover the Necronomicon (or the Book of Eibon, or the Pnakotic Manuscripts, or von Juntz's Nameless Cults) and then regret it when appalling monsters come to visit.

Actually I borrowed, purloined, stole or just plain ripped off the character of Kamose from genuine Egyptian legends that survive in a few papyri of late date ? Ptolemaic, probably. That's to say, somewhere around 300 to 100 BCE. The main one is usually known as "The Story of Satni-Kamose." With a few different spellings like Setnau Khemuast and others, in different versions.

The legend goes that Kamose was a learned young man who, instead of doing healthy things like driving his chariot too fast and drinking in beer-houses, went around visiting secret temple libraries to study arcane and magical writings. While he was browsing among the inscriptions on the walls of the Temple of Ptah in Memphis, a stranger approached him and said mockingly, "Why waste your time studying these writings which will not bring you any power? True knowledge and power is found in the Forty-Two Scrolls of thoth. I can show you where they are."

Kamose's interest was so strong that he took only passing notice of the stranger's archaic clothes and headdress. Neither, being na?ve, did he wonder about any ulterior motives the stranger might have. It turned out later that he was a ghost who'd been buried apart from his wife and son, and wanted their mummies brought back to be interred in the same tomb with him, as the price of the knowledge he offered. He didn't mention that he and his wife and son had all died because he meddled with the Scrolls of Thoth, from the ibis-headed god's vengeance.

Kamose had a wife and three small children himself, one just born. He refused to listen to his wife's fears that the scrolls would bring disaster, and removed them from the hidden tomb the ghost showed him. He copied all the spells and sorceries in them to other papyrus with wizard's ink, washed it off with pomegranate wine, and drank the wine with weird incantations and rituals. After that, he knew forever the magic in the Scrolls of Thoth, and even the god could not make him forget them ? but being possessive and unforgiving, Thoth took retribution for that. The details are in "Haunted Shadows", which appeared in WEIRD TALES #321, the fall 2000 issue. I'm hoping it will be reprinted in a collection of the Kamose stories written so far.

The original legends identify Kamose with Prince Khaemwese, fourth son of Rameses II and High Priest of Ptah in Memphis. They were written much later, though, and for my purposes I've assumed that Kamose the Magician was confused with Prince Khaemwese, a quite different person, who was born after the magician and died long before him. (Look on a good search engine for references to "Book of Thoth" and "Khaemwese son of Rameses II.")

My Kamose the Magician was born in the third year of the brief reign of the Pharaoh Ay, an elderly schemer who succeeded and may even have murdered the young king Tutankhamen. Kamose's father was Rimakamani, a priest of Amun-Ra (the most important Egyptian god of the time) noted court magician in his own right, and 28 years old when Kamose was born. He had two other sons and two daughters. Rimakamani's parents were an Egyptian father and Syrian mother. His wife Henut-Aneb was pure Egyptian, and tended to remind her husband of it sharply when they quarreled. Since she was conceited and cold, and he was touchy about his Syrian blood, this happened pretty often, friends. Besides, Rimakamani was ambitious, much occupied with court and temple politics in Thebes, and with the demands of his position. He aimed at becoming Archpriest of Amun-Ra and also vizier of Egypt. (He never achieved either, though he did become one of the highest court magicians.) Not completely surprising that Kamose as a youth became withdrawn and studious, a seeker of secret knowledge.

The Pharaoh Ay reigned only four years, and Kamose grew to youth and manhood in the reign of Horemheb, who succeeded Ay. Horemheb is generally seen as the Oliver Cromwell of ancient Egypt, tough, devout, uncompromising, and a better soldier than he was a ruler. He devoted his reign to mending the damage done to Egypt's defenses and military prestige during Akhenaten's reign, and to restoring the traditional worship of Egypt's gods ? chief among them Amun-Ra of Thebes.

Kamose's contemporary, about ten years older, was the Biblical character known to us as Moses. Who wasn't as the Bible presents him. The idea's nothing new, but it bears repeating. Freud among others pointed out that Moses was Egyptian, not Hebrew, in language, culture and upbringing, and most likely by descent as well. The later Israelites couldn't entertain the idea that their greatest prophet and lawgiver had been as Egyptian as the pyramids; the story of the basket in the bulrushes was to give him an "acceptable", that is, purely Hebrew, ancestry. Of course, it was also a standard hero's origin story. The lost infant whose antecedents, parentage and true destiny are unknown until he's fully grown. That basic myth has been told about Romulus and Remus, Sargon of Akkad, Perseus, and for that matter, Tarzan and Luke Skywalker.

A minor reason for the ark-in-the-bullrushes story may have been to explain away his name; his original, Egyptian name. "Moses" is an Egyptian word meaning "derived from" or "the child of" It's almost always found in combination with the name of a god, as in Rameses or Ra-moses, "derived from Ra" and Tuthmoses or Thothmes, "derived from Thoth". If Moses' orginal name meant "derived from the river", it would have been Hapimoses or Hapmes, Hapi being the god of the Nile. Later generations of Israelites wouldn't have been inclined to commemorate the name of a pagan god, worshipped by their legendary oppressors, in the story of their greatest hero. The "Hapi" part was no doubt quietly dropped, and soon forgotten.

Kamose never heard of Hapimoses until much later. He married at twenty-two, when he was a scribe and junior priest in the Temple of Thoth. His wife Teti was a pleasant, loving girl of good family who had two children in the next four years and had become pregnant again when Kamose encountered the judge's ghost in the temple of Ptah. The couple's lives took a turn for the worse as Kamose became obsessed with finding the Scrolls of Thoth, and for the very worst when he did obtain them. Teti and the youngest baby were drowned on the Nile; the other children died too, in the Delta city of Per-Bastet, despite all Kamose's efforts to protect them. "

B)

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#22 deuce

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 04:21 AM

Taylor has written a fine article about REH and King Saul for the TGR blog here:


http://rehtwogunraconteur.com/?p=8090

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#23 thedarkman

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:17 AM

Hey deuce, just picked-up a copy of Keith Taylor's Bard I, very nice shape for real cheap. I have been watching for a copy of any of the Bard novels, and found the first one in a small used book store in my own little town(you never know where you will find a treasure). Once I finish When Death Birds Fly, this is my next read. If I like the storyline, is it worth looking for further novels? I hear Bard V is next to impossible to find at a reasonable price.

#24 deuce

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:50 AM

Hey deuce, just picked-up a copy of Keith Taylor's Bard I, very nice shape for real cheap. I have been watching for a copy of any of the Bard novels, and found the first one in a small used book store in my own little town(you never know where you will find a treasure). Once I finish When Death Birds Fly, this is my next read. If I like the storyline, is it worth looking for further novels? I hear Bard V is next to impossible to find at a reasonable price.


You're an Aussie, right? "Bard" novels have been fairly easy to find here in the Midwest up until the last 5-10yrs.

As for more Felimid/"Bard" novels, pick 'em up. I feel that Bard II is just as good as the first one, if not better. Steve Tompkins (RIP) thought Ravens Gathering the best of the lot by a small margin.

One thing about the first 3 Felimid novels (especially) is that Taylor was using the early Conan saga as a framework (along with elements from Howard's CMA yarns) but giving them profound twists. He works in TTotE, QotBC, etc... He also uses Anderson's Hrolf Kraki's Saga as a backstory.

Bard V: Felimid's Homecoming is a bitch to find under $30. It's a bit uneven, but the main villain (appearance-wise, he predates Darth Maul by 10yrs) is great and you really get a feel for 6th century Erin in the book. It's a "transitional" novel. If you finish Bard IV and are still hungry, I recommend it.



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#25 thedarkman

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 06:23 AM

Actually, I'm a Canuck, born and bred. I live in N.W. Ontario, which is a pretty remote place, kinda like Cimmeria or even Asgard( however, I was not born on a battlefield, or any other field for that matter!). I look forward to reading Bard, and I will keep a lookout for any of the others. Where I live, I'm about 2 1/2 hours hwy travel from any city, so I don't have access to large used book sources.To make things worse, I have also come down with an uncontrolable urge to gather s&s anthologies. I have Flashing Swords #2, Sword and Sorceress III and IV, and I am going to pick-up The Years Best Fantasy 4 this week. What I really want to gather is the Swords Against Darkness set and KEW's Echoes of Valor series. Any thoughts on these or others?

#26 thedarkman

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 04:22 PM

Just picked-up the first 2 Danans books, by Keith Taylor. I don't know a whole lot about the stories, but everything I have read by Keith has been very good. I recently read Hungry Grass in a S&S anthology, and it was really fun. I would love to see a collection of his short stories in one big omnibus. This author is one of the best S&S/fantasy/adventure writers of our time, and there is so little of his work available; it's a real shame. Keith is easily as good as the awesome Karl Edward Wagner, in his own special way. I raise a foaming jack of ale in his name!

#27 thedarkman

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:58 AM

My order has arrived from a near-by bookseller, and I now have Bard II and Bard IV in my collection. I have Bard I, and really enjoyed reading it. Recently, I picked up Bard III, but I held off reading it until I could find the second book. Now I have them all! Well, almost. Bard V is going to have to wait, since it wasn't published in North America (I think), it is very expensive to buy online. Unless someone out there has an extra copy they need to get rid of... :P

Edited by thedarkman, 15 April 2012 - 05:59 AM.


#28 Axerules

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 03:14 AM

Keith Taylor's new book, Servant of the Jackal God: The Tales of Kamose, Archpriest of Anubis, just came out. It collects his fantasy stories set in ancient Egypt published in Weird Tales since 1999 (plus two new yarns).


Posted Image

http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/1617207292

A review: http://www.tangenton...by-keith-taylor
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#29 thedarkman

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 04:44 AM

Whoo-hoo !! Great news indeed. I NEED to get this book.

#30 deuce

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 05:40 AM

Whoo-hoo !! Great news indeed. I NEED to get this book.


Right with ya, bro! Some truly EXCELLENT tales in that collection. EXACTLY why I've suggested for years that Keith would be one of THE "go-to" guys to write any sort of Stygian/Hyborian Age pastiches. B)

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#31 deuce

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 10:21 PM

Keith Taylor's new book, Servant of the Jackal God: The Tales of Kamose, Archpriest of Anubis, just came out. It collects his fantasy stories set in ancient Egypt published in Weird Tales since 1999 (plus two new yarns).


Posted Image

http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/1617207292

A review: http://www.tangenton...by-keith-taylor


Just ordered it from Amazon! Can't wait. B)

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#32 docpod

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 02:47 AM

Now if we can just get the rest of the Keith Taylor stories collected into some companion volumes. Best writer of Celtic based fantasy that is written.

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#33 deuce

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 10:00 PM

Taylor discusses his Egyptian wizard-priest,, Kamose, here:

"In the short stories, Kamose is the Archpriest of Anubis, the jackal-headed god of cemeteries, embalming and funerary rites, the bitter and hated rival of the priesthood of Thoth. The stories take place in the brief reign of Pharaoh Setekh-Nekht, and then at the beginning of the reign of his son, Rameses III. That is to say, approximately in 1205 BCE. Kamose has extended his life span quite extraordinarily, and no-one except himself knows how he achieved this any longer. He's outlived all those human beings who ever did know.

The novel harks back to a time a century before, the reign of Seti I, in that Pharaoh's fifth regnal year. Kamose is then thirty-six, and the novel ? working title SNAKE BENEATH THE THRONE ? set in Damascus, makes known how Kamose became quasi-immortal, with sidelights on the Hebrews, Moses, their early, unsuccessful, attempt at an invasion of Caanan, and the real nature of the serpent of Eden.

Kamose has a varied and eventful career behind him already. As a youth he was neither a magician nor formidable. In fact he was an unworldly scholar and junior priest. He had yearnings to become great in magic, though, and a taste for forbidden writings on arcane and sorcerous lore, which he was always seeking in the indicted sections of temple libraries. He was pretty much an ancient Egyptian version of Lovecraft's New England scholars and warlocks who discover the Necronomicon (or the Book of Eibon, or the Pnakotic Manuscripts, or von Juntz's Nameless Cults) and then regret it when appalling monsters come to visit.

Actually I borrowed, purloined, stole or just plain ripped off the character of Kamose from genuine Egyptian legends that survive in a few papyri of late date ? Ptolemaic, probably. That's to say, somewhere around 300 to 100 BCE. The main one is usually known as "The Story of Satni-Kamose." With a few different spellings like Setnau Khemuast and others, in different versions.

The legend goes that Kamose was a learned young man who, instead of doing healthy things like driving his chariot too fast and drinking in beer-houses, went around visiting secret temple libraries to study arcane and magical writings. While he was browsing among the inscriptions on the walls of the Temple of Ptah in Memphis, a stranger approached him and said mockingly, "Why waste your time studying these writings which will not bring you any power? True knowledge and power is found in the Forty-Two Scrolls of thoth. I can show you where they are."

Kamose's interest was so strong that he took only passing notice of the stranger's archaic clothes and headdress. Neither, being na?ve, did he wonder about any ulterior motives the stranger might have. It turned out later that he was a ghost who'd been buried apart from his wife and son, and wanted their mummies brought back to be interred in the same tomb with him, as the price of the knowledge he offered. He didn't mention that he and his wife and son had all died because he meddled with the Scrolls of Thoth, from the ibis-headed god's vengeance.

Kamose had a wife and three small children himself, one just born. He refused to listen to his wife's fears that the scrolls would bring disaster, and removed them from the hidden tomb the ghost showed him. He copied all the spells and sorceries in them to other papyrus with wizard's ink, washed it off with pomegranate wine, and drank the wine with weird incantations and rituals. After that, he knew forever the magic in the Scrolls of Thoth, and even the god could not make him forget them ? but being possessive and unforgiving, Thoth took retribution for that. The details are in "Haunted Shadows", which appeared in WEIRD TALES #321, the fall 2000 issue. I'm hoping it will be reprinted in a collection of the Kamose stories written so far.

The original legends identify Kamose with Prince Khaemwese, fourth son of Rameses II and High Priest of Ptah in Memphis. They were written much later, though, and for my purposes I've assumed that Kamose the Magician was confused with Prince Khaemwese, a quite different person, who was born after the magician and died long before him. (Look on a good search engine for references to "Book of Thoth" and "Khaemwese son of Rameses II.")

My Kamose the Magician was born in the third year of the brief reign of the Pharaoh Ay, an elderly schemer who succeeded and may even have murdered the young king Tutankhamen. Kamose's father was Rimakamani, a priest of Amun-Ra (the most important Egyptian god of the time) noted court magician in his own right, and 28 years old when Kamose was born. He had two other sons and two daughters. Rimakamani's parents were an Egyptian father and Syrian mother. His wife Henut-Aneb was pure Egyptian, and tended to remind her husband of it sharply when they quarreled. Since she was conceited and cold, and he was touchy about his Syrian blood, this happened pretty often, friends. Besides, Rimakamani was ambitious, much occupied with court and temple politics in Thebes, and with the demands of his position. He aimed at becoming Archpriest of Amun-Ra and also vizier of Egypt. (He never achieved either, though he did become one of the highest court magicians.) Not completely surprising that Kamose as a youth became withdrawn and studious, a seeker of secret knowledge.

The Pharaoh Ay reigned only four years, and Kamose grew to youth and manhood in the reign of Horemheb, who succeeded Ay. Horemheb is generally seen as the Oliver Cromwell of ancient Egypt, tough, devout, uncompromising, and a better soldier than he was a ruler. He devoted his reign to mending the damage done to Egypt's defenses and military prestige during Akhenaten's reign, and to restoring the traditional worship of Egypt's gods ? chief among them Amun-Ra of Thebes.

Kamose's contemporary, about ten years older, was the Biblical character known to us as Moses. Who wasn't as the Bible presents him. The idea's nothing new, but it bears repeating. Freud among others pointed out that Moses was Egyptian, not Hebrew, in language, culture and upbringing, and most likely by descent as well. The later Israelites couldn't entertain the idea that their greatest prophet and lawgiver had been as Egyptian as the pyramids; the story of the basket in the bulrushes was to give him an "acceptable", that is, purely Hebrew, ancestry. Of course, it was also a standard hero's origin story. The lost infant whose antecedents, parentage and true destiny are unknown until he's fully grown. That basic myth has been told about Romulus and Remus, Sargon of Akkad, Perseus, and for that matter, Tarzan and Luke Skywalker.

A minor reason for the ark-in-the-bullrushes story may have been to explain away his name; his original, Egyptian name. "Moses" is an Egyptian word meaning "derived from" or "the child of" It's almost always found in combination with the name of a god, as in Rameses or Ra-moses, "derived from Ra" and Tuthmoses or Thothmes, "derived from Thoth". If Moses' orginal name meant "derived from the river", it would have been Hapimoses or Hapmes, Hapi being the god of the Nile. Later generations of Israelites wouldn't have been inclined to commemorate the name of a pagan god, worshipped by their legendary oppressors, in the story of their greatest hero. The "Hapi" part was no doubt quietly dropped, and soon forgotten.

Kamose never heard of Hapimoses until much later. He married at twenty-two, when he was a scribe and junior priest in the Temple of Thoth. His wife Teti was a pleasant, loving girl of good family who had two children in the next four years and had become pregnant again when Kamose encountered the judge's ghost in the temple of Ptah. The couple's lives took a turn for the worse as Kamose became obsessed with finding the Scrolls of Thoth, and for the very worst when he did obtain them. Teti and the youngest baby were drowned on the Nile; the other children died too, in the Delta city of Per-Bastet, despite all Kamose's efforts to protect them. "


Servant of the Jackal God can be purchased from Amazon here:

http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/1617207292

This volume also contains tales of the thief, Si-Hotep. A pity that this edition doesn't contain the illustrations done for Weird Tales by Stephen Fabian.

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#34 deuce

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 09:32 PM

Keith Taylor's new book, Servant of the Jackal God: The Tales of Kamose, Archpriest of Anubis, just came out. It collects his fantasy stories set in ancient Egypt published in Weird Tales since 1999 (plus two new yarns).


Posted Image

http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/1617207292

A review: http://www.tangenton...by-keith-taylor


Just came in the mail. B) Hope to read it this weekend. Now, off to work.

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#35 deuce

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 05:23 AM

Al Harron gives a shout-out to Keith Taylor in this post:

http://theblogthatti...some-links.html

Take my word for it: if you're a fan of Egyptian historical fantasy, Servant of the Jackal God will rock you hard. Keith has 12th century Pharaonic Egypt DOWN. Great action and great characters.

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#36 deuce

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 01:46 PM

Just got an email from Mr. Taylor regarding Servant of the Jackal God:



"The original germ of the character came when I wanted a change from Celtic and barbaric characters. What country in the ancient world was more civilized than Egypt? What culture more different to those of north-western Europe? Besides, I’d read Mika Waltari’s brilliant THE EGYPTIAN in my teens. It had made an impression that – as far as historical novels go – only Mary Renault’s novels of ancient Greece and Bengtsson’s THE LONG SHIPS could equal for me. The superb sets and costumes of de Mille’s THE TEN COMMANDMENTS were a visual treat I never forgot, either.

An Egyptian. All right, but not a warrior. A priestly wizard. (I’d already done a lot of research on ancient Egypt and Kush for a trilogy of novels about a Nubian scribe living in the reign of Hatshepsut, for which I never found a publisher and so never developed beyond the outline and first few chapters.) I fancied a sinister wizard as the protagonist. The sorcerers in Clark Ashton Smith’s stories had a good deal to do with that. Malygris, and Namirrha in "The Dark Eidolon", and others. I suppose, thinking about it, that REH’s Thoth-Amon had burrowed into my brain and played his part in the process. Hell. I know he had.


Then I discovered a personage in actual Egyptian legend who was tailor-made to use and expand on. He’s known as Satni-Kamose or Setnau Khaemuast in a papyrus of late date – Ptolemaic, very likely. The original is in the Cairo Museum. Mariette translated it first, in 1871. Flinders Petrie published a version in English in 1895, in his EGYPTIAN TALES, and Gaston Maspero reworked it in 1915 in his STORIES OF ANCIENT EGYPT. I first read about it in one of L. Sprague de Camp’s books, long ago, and since then I found the stories of Satni-Kamose in EGYPTIAN LEGENDS AND STORIES by M.V. Seton-Williams.

“Satni” seems to be a colloquialism meaning something like “priest” or “sage”. “Kamose” was one of the princes of Thebes who fought against the Hyksos and finally expelled them from the Delta, but the character in the original stories is not based on him; he’s based on Khaemwese, who was a son of Rameses II and a High Priest of Ptah in Memphis. (I have a character in one of my stories explain scornfully that this is mere legend, and that the sorcerer Kamose has been confused with Prince Khaemwese in common myth-making.)

Kamose’s back-story and origin is borrowed from the papyrus. When a studious young priest he constantly sought arcane knowledge; a ghost approached him and offered to show him the hiding place of the Scrolls of Thoth in exchange for giving the ghost’s wife proper burial beside him; Kamose obtains the scrolls and the vast magical knowledge within them, but the vengeance of Thoth destroys his own wife and children. (The flashback account is in “Haunted Shadows”.)

One of the original stories in the Ptolemaic source has a Kushite magician using his sorcery to beat the King of Egypt with many blows in the night, and Kamose retaliating against the King of Kush, or Ethiopia. I borrowed that, too, and adapted it in “Emissaries of Doom”.

Most of the stories don’t borrow from the Ptolemaic originals. Kamose is abnormally long-lived – my stories assume he was born in the brief reign of the Pharaoh Ay, who preceded Horemheb, and now, a hundred and thirty-five years later, in about the year 1200 BCE, he’s still bitter in his enmity against the god Thoth and his priesthood. “Daggers and a Serpent” and “Emissaries of Doom” both take place in the reign of Setekh-Nekht or Setnakht, the father of Rameses III. The rest of the stories in SERVANT OF THE JACKAL GOD are all set early in Rameses’ reign. (Not to be confused with Rameses II, played by Yul Brynner in TTC. It’d be easy to do. The third Rameses not only shared his name but copied his royal sobriquets, named his own sons after sons of the earlier Rameses, and worked hard to emulate him.)

So, with regard to Kamose the Magician, that’s about it. Except that I’m working balls out on a novel that’s a direct sequel to the collection just published. Working title? THE JACKAL GOD’S HUNTER. It takes Kamose down to Kush, to settle accounts with Tayo, the magician who murdered Pharaoh Setekh-Nekht, and prevent a revolt. He doesn’t want to go, thinks the task beneath him, but circumstances compel him – and he learns that he’s underestimated Tayo, “this wretched Kushite”, who turns out to be more powerful than Kamose suspected."

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#37 deuce

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 09:51 AM

Myself and Morgan Holmes have posted reviews of Servant of the Jackal God on Amazon:


http://www.amazon.co...ords=jackal god

 


BTW, today is Keith's birthday. :)


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#38 Tex

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 07:45 AM

Happy birthday, Mr. Taylor!

My copy of Servant of the Jackal God is on the way from Amazon, and should be here before year's end.

Tex
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#39 BarB

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 01:19 AM

Just ordered mine at Amazon. Should be here right after Jan 1st. Nice way to start the new year!
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#40 Keith J Taylor

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 11:32 AM

I gulp and shuffle my feet, people.  All this is hugely flattering.  Quote from Dorothy Dunnett, THE GAME OF KINGS ... "I can say naught but holy gee ho!  Words which belong to the cart and the plough." 

 

As to current news ... I confess to having abandoned the "origin and backstory" novel for Kamose the Magician for the time being.  I'd still wish to do it someday, but for now it seemed better to produce a direct sequel to SERVANT OF THE JACKAL GOD.  I've been cautioned against spoilers, so I'll just say that THE JACKAL GOD'S HUNTER (working title) takes Kamose down to Kush, which we call the Sudan today, and which of course was the best-known black kingdom in the Age of Conan, "the northernmost, in fact" as REH wrote.  It became the colloquial Hyborian term for the black kingdoms in general.  That prehistoric Kush was the progenitor of the Kush our ancient Egyptians knew.  In  his "Imaro" novels, Charles Saunders has used a kingdom called "Cush" as a setting.  Same historical source.  I take it there's NO sword-and-sorcery fan out there anywhere who doesn't know and admire the Imaro stories by this time?  Right.  Thought not.

 

Again ... I'm really grateful for the interest and praise.