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Solomon Kane's Middle Name


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#1 Taran

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 09:24 PM

In "Red Shadows", Solomon Kane carves the initial S.L.K. in the bandit Jean's face. Do we have any indication what the "L" might stand for?
"It has fallen upon me, now and again in my sojourns through the world, to ease various evil men of their lives." - Solomon Kane

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#2 crossplain pilgrim

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 10:02 PM

Not of which I am aware. On a purely speculative note, I think the "L" could stand for Leviticus, the chapter in the bible that explains many of the Hewbrew clensing rituals and how to deal with various taboos, including sorcery. Solomon Leviticus Kane has a nice Puritanical ring to it.
A wild moon rode in the wild white clouds,
the waves their white crests showed
When Solomon Kane went forth again,
and no man knew his road.

"Solomon Kane's Homecoming"

#3 Haemogoblin

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 11:29 PM

I don't think a Puritan would take the name of the book as a personal name. Perhaps Levi, which is what the title Leviticus derives from.
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#4 Taranaich

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 06:59 PM

The names "Solomon" and "Kane" are highly charged with Hebrew/Christian symbolism, so it follows that the "L" would too.

From that point of view, Levi's a good one: one translation is "united as one." The good Solomon united with the evil Kane.

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#5 Ironhand

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 09:57 AM

How 'bout "Solomon Lazarus Kane"?
"Did you deem yourself strong, because you were able to twist the heads off civilized folk, poor weaklings with muscles like rotten string? Hell! Break the neck of a wild Cimmerian bull before you call yourself strong. I did that, before I was a full-grown man...!" - Conan, in "Shadows in Zamboula", by Robert E. Howard
"... you speak of Venarium familiarly. Perhaps you were there?"
"I was," grunted [Conan]. "I was one of the horde that swarmed over the hills. I hadn't yet seen fifteen snows, but already my name was repeated about the council fires." - "Beyond the Black River", by Robert E. Howard

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#6 Haemogoblin

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 04:36 PM

That's a pretty good one. It'd certainly fit with Mr. Basset's conception of Kane. Something tells me Lot and Lucifer are both unlikely.
He is grim and loveless, but at birth he breathes power to strive and slay into a man's soul. What else shall men ask of the gods?- Queen of the Black Coast

#7 Ho there Semiramis!

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 08:37 PM

It may not be a middle name at all, but rather a slang term.
Perhaps one of the following:
Lown rascal
Lousy louse ridden
Leman a male or female lover.
We know from Richard Toogood?s definitive chronology that he assisted Sir John Hawkins on several slave trading voyages, so he may have adopted it then. According to Toogood, Kane would have been in his mid to late teens, so perhaps it was a friendly nickname given to him by other crew members.
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#8 Ho there Semiramis!

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 10:01 PM

I've changed my mind it has got to be

LEROY

Because he?s more than trouble

He?s the baddest man in the whole damn town

Badder than old King Kong

Meaner than a junkyard dog.
O Pan! Io Pan!
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#9 Taranaich

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 03:51 AM

How 'bout "Solomon Lazarus Kane"?


In addition to the "risen from the dead/new life" connotations, the name originally means "God has helped" - which has interesting associations with Kane. Some historians make a comparison between the Lazarus parable and the Egyptian story of Osiris, which certainly adds resonance to Solomon's dual Christian/Pagan nature.

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#10 Ho there Semiramis!

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 12:15 PM

My link

Taking these names as examples how about:

Lord's-Work-Sinners-Don't-Like-It-Up-Em

Edited by Ho there Semiramis!, 04 May 2010 - 12:18 PM.

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#11 Taran

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 05:38 PM

Lord's-Work-Sinners-Don't-Like-It-Up-Em


Or...Solomon "Let's-kick-their-ass-for-the-Lord" Kane.
"It has fallen upon me, now and again in my sojourns through the world, to ease various evil men of their lives." - Solomon Kane

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http://onelastsketch.wordpress.com/

#12 Mikey_C

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 06:07 PM

I'm for Lamentation!

Puritan names.
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#13 nephron

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 04:56 AM

In "Red Shadows", Solomon Kane carves the initial S.L.K. in the bandit Jean's face. Do we have any indication what the "L" might stand for?


Maybe "SLK" doesn't imply a middle name at all. Perhaps it's some kind of antiquated convention, or Kane's own idiosyncratic way of representing "SoLomon Kane".

When did middle names become common in the English-speaking world anyway?

Edited by nephron, 11 May 2010 - 04:56 AM.


#14 Kortoso

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 06:15 PM

Could be a christening or confirmation name, or mother's maiden name. Our middle name practice is fairly recent. http://en.wikipedia....iki/Middle_name

Edit: "Englishmen do not have middle names, as a rule. Middle names are in general found only in Europe, especially in Germany and Spain, until the 17th century. Where we find them in some lists, the odds are good that the records from which they were taken were contradictory, illegible, or wrong. "

Sauce: http://www.elizabeth...pendium/42.html


#15 crossplain pilgrim

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 03:52 AM

Speaking of Puritan names of note, I think one of the better ones was the handle worn by one of William Brewster's sons. Brewster wasn't exactly a Puritan. Being one of the original Pilgrims (and a governor of the Plymouth colony) he was a Separatist, who held similar views to those of the Puritans but wanted completely out of the Church of England. The Puritans wanted to stay in the church and "purify" it of its Catholic traditions. Anyway, Brewster named his son "Wrestles With The Devil" Brewster. Certainly, our Solomon Kane went a few falls with the old deceiver.
A wild moon rode in the wild white clouds,
the waves their white crests showed
When Solomon Kane went forth again,
and no man knew his road.

"Solomon Kane's Homecoming"

#16 tom hyle

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 03:51 PM

At one time in Europe people would recieve a, usually native European, "birth name" and only at the "age of reason" when legally able to undertake understanding and contracts, at "confirmation" in a church, would they recieve a Greek or Afrasian "Christian name" from the Bible. The birth name was often retained, though unofficially, as a middle name, often used as a familiar name.
"Le Roy" meaning "[the] King" is in the category of ironic slave names like "Caesar" and "Hannibal".

Edited by tom hyle, 02 August 2010 - 03:52 PM.


#17 Ironhand

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Posted 03 August 2010 - 10:10 AM

At one time in Europe people would recieve a, usually native European, "birth name" and only at the "age of reason" when legally able to undertake understanding and contracts, at "confirmation" in a church, would they recieve a Greek or Afrasian "Christian name" from the Bible. The birth name was often retained, though unofficially, as a middle name, often used as a familiar name.

Could you give an example?
"Did you deem yourself strong, because you were able to twist the heads off civilized folk, poor weaklings with muscles like rotten string? Hell! Break the neck of a wild Cimmerian bull before you call yourself strong. I did that, before I was a full-grown man...!" - Conan, in "Shadows in Zamboula", by Robert E. Howard
"... you speak of Venarium familiarly. Perhaps you were there?"
"I was," grunted [Conan]. "I was one of the horde that swarmed over the hills. I hadn't yet seen fifteen snows, but already my name was repeated about the council fires." - "Beyond the Black River", by Robert E. Howard

Read my Conan screenplays at The Scrolls of Ironhand (in particular my transcription of THE FROST GIANT'S DAUGHTER in Act II of "The Snow Devil") at
http://www.scrollsof...d.us/index.html or at
http://www.delicious...ic=ConanProject

#18 Kahn

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 06:00 PM

How about "Luther".
Kane was a Puritan and Martin Luther was the iconic figure in the protestant reformation, if memory serves me, so there's my logic.

I just recently joined the forum, long time lurker and first time post so forgive my late offering to the thread.

#19 Tex

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 11:01 PM

Welcome to the REH Forum, Kahn!

And thanks for resurrecting this topic. Hard to believe it's been untouched for about 11 months!

Tex
(who really likes the sound of Solomon Luther Kane)

#20 Jessie

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 05:50 AM


In "Red Shadows", Solomon Kane carves the initial S.L.K. in the bandit Jean's face. Do we have any indication what the "L" might stand for?


Maybe "SLK" doesn't imply a middle name at all. Perhaps it's some kind of antiquated convention, or Kane's own idiosyncratic way of representing "SoLomon Kane".

When did middle names become common in the English-speaking world anyway?


This was my thoughts as I listened to the audio book.